Cameron's Veto May Isolate Britain From Europe
His EU veto could have major ramifications
By John Johnson,  Newser Staff
Posted Dec 9, 2011 12:21 PM CST
British Prime Minister David Cameron speaks during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels on Friday.   (AP Photo/Michel Euler)

(Newser) – David Cameron's decision to exercise Britain's veto and sit out negotiations on a new EU treaty is being seen as a momentous move, even if the ramifications aren't quite clear yet:

  • New York Times: The decision "has left Britain as isolated as it has ever been in postwar Europe and effectively left out of future European decisions," write Sarah Lyall and Julia Werdigier. They add, however, that "there was widespread confusion over what this all actually means."
  • Guardian: "I do not hear the sound of champagne corks or celebration among British Eurosceptics," writes Michael White. "Beware of what you wish for, is a wise saying. Who knows what happens now? But Europe, for all its follies and failings, has become a scapegoat for weaknesses that are really our own. We may be about to rediscover that awkward truth. It was why we joined in the first place."

  • Global Post: "Britain will not be part of the negotiations defining the new fiscal union, setting the stage for a two-tier Europe. Britain’s opt-out is a monumental development for Europe, and a significant defeat" for Cameron, writes Michael Goldfarb. Germany, France, and Britain always found a way to find a deal in the past, but this time there was no leeway "to fudge and play politics with the solutions."
  • Telegraph: "Mr. Cameron was right to reject a deal designed by the French, for the French," blogs Benedict Brogan. "At the heart of this dispute is France's desire to see Britain out of the EU, and (London) marginalized. That was why they loaded the package with elements Britain could not accept. Downing Street officials are clear about what the French are up to, and why the Prime Minister had no choice but to say non."

 

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