Weirdest. Super Bowl. Ever.
Writers react to the blackout, the no-call, and the almost comeback
By Kevin Spak,  Newser Staff
Posted Feb 4, 2013 12:29 PM CST
Updated Feb 4, 2013 1:57 PM CST
Fans hoist a sign of Baltimore Ravens' Ray Lewis as they walk down Bourbon Street while celebrating the Ravens' victory in Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans, Feb. 3, 2013.   (AP Photo/Matthew Hinton)

(Newser) – America is basically talking about five things today: The blackout, the no-call, Beyonce, the bad ads, and the 49ers' near-comeback. And that's not even touching on the F-bomb, the 108-yard-return, the Sandy Hook kids, or any number of other subplots that made this "a truly cool Super Bowl," writes Mike Downey at CNN. "I have sat through quite a few bad, bad Super Bowls in my day," he writes. "Trust me, Sunday's game … was a classic." He's not alone. Here's what people are saying:

  • "This Super Bowl was one for the ages, although perhaps the Dark Ages," agrees Lynn Zinser at the New York Times. Thanks to the blackout, it "became a combination of social commentary on the failing state of our infrastructure and slapstick comedy drawn from the lessons of Hurricane Katrina," and will go down "in the pantheon of Super Bowls as the strangest one ever."
  • The best team won, argues Bill Barnwell at Grantland, which is pretty incredible given that they often looked mediocre during the regular season. The lesson? "We know way less about teams than we really think we know. … The Ravens are the 2011 Giants or the 2007 Giants, or the 2010 Packers. They're the reminders that you don't get the full picture of a team from a 16-game sample."
  • As for the refs' controversial decision not to throw a holding flag, Mike Pereira at Fox Sports thinks they made the right (no) call. "It's the type of play where a flag thrown against either team would have, in my mind, created more controversy than a decision not to throw the flag."