Case Against Brooklyn 'Killer' Falls Apart 23 Years Later
David Ranta expected to be set free this week
By John Johnson, Newser Staff
Posted Mar 20, 2013 1:15 PM CDT
   (Shutterstock)

(Newser) – David Ranta has been in prison since 1991 for the murder of a Brooklyn rabbi in a high-profile city slaying. Ranta is now packing up his cell, however, because prosecutors plan to ask a judge this week to set him free, reports the New York Times. No physical evidence tied Ranta to the killing, and a review of the case strongly suggests that police framed him. Consider a supposed eyewitness, then 13, who recalled that before entering the lineup room, "a police detective told me to 'pick the guy with big nose.'"

Or the girlfriend of a criminal who implicated Ranta: "I made up everything," she says, in order to get her boyfriend a deal. As for Ranta, now 58: "I came in here as a 30-something with kids, a mother who was alive," he says. "This case killed my whole life.” The real killer appears to be a man who has since died in a car accident, at least according to his widow, who knows details of the murder that weren't made public. Click for the full story on the cold case, and how Ranta's defense attorney kept it alive.

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Showing 3 of 13 comments
Daniel-from-TN
Mar 22, 2013 5:37 PM CDT
I wonder if the cops who framed him will face charges of perjury and/or criminal conspiracy. OH! How silly of me to think such a thing. They're cops. Of course they won't be prosecuted. In many places it is policy to NOT prosecute cops, regardless of the crime or evidence. About 20 years ago a man was caught shoplifting at a local mall. He was caught in the act by a mall security guard and the entire event was caught on surveillance cameras. After learning that the thief was a local police officer the district attorney's office refused to prosecute the case, and also refused to state why.
BenDunn
Mar 21, 2013 11:13 AM CDT
Frigging cops again. It seems the police are our worst enemy. I think America will rue the fact we have allowed cops to consider themselves Above the very laws they are sworn to uphold. Anyone want to speculate if the cops are prosecuted, or left to retire in peace on our dime.
honeybaz
Mar 20, 2013 10:57 PM CDT
Let's see, the 100th person to be exonerated (that was even on death row for several years) was convicted three times by a jury! Anyone that thinks we have not killed innocent men (or women) in this country or that believes it serves any purpose other than some prosecutorial or law enforcement revenge, is sadly mistaken. No amount of money can bring this man his life back and no amount of innocents that are taken out of prison decades later by their attorneys (that so many people would spit on any other day of the week because of the work they do as defense attorneys) or by the Innocence Projects will ever convince anyone of the problems with our system; esp. the death penalty. I'm sure everyone thought this man was as guilty as the ones you insist must be killed for their crimes. Life without parole is cheaper and has much more benefit to what is supposed to be a humane (and Christian) society. Someone will figure out how to make sure he gets little to no financial compensation.....