Monster Energy Drinks Sues San Francisco
Fight to limit caffeine, marketing goes to federal court
By John Johnson, Newser Staff
Posted May 1, 2013 12:57 PM CDT
A can of Monster energy drink.   (?)

(Newser) – San Francisco's city attorney wants Monster Beverage to cut down on both the caffeine in its energy drinks and the marketing of them, and the company is fighting back in federal court. Monster sued the office of Dennis Herrera this week, arguing that its drinks are no more harmful than a cup of Starbucks coffee and making the case that only the FDA can regulate the market, reports the Wall Street Journal.

One thing in particular that irritates Herrera is that the company has a Monster Army website for kids that shows an 11-year-old "Monster Army Major" and a 6-year-old "Reserve," reports the San Francisco Chronicle. So, yes, the energy drinks have less caffeine than a cup at Starbucks, but the coffee chain "isn’t marketing sweet drinks that are highly caffeinated to young people,” says a Herrera spokesperson. The legal fight comes amid heightened scrutiny of energy drinks not only by the FDA but by New York state in particular.

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Showing 3 of 20 comments
Drewzy
May 2, 2013 1:17 PM CDT
It's getting to the point where greedy corps. would sell aresenic in our softdrinks and the right wingnuts would defend their right to do so.
right2dave
May 2, 2013 12:37 AM CDT
God that stuff taste like shit. Who can drink it?
ppaca
May 1, 2013 8:33 PM CDT
I'm tired of the government trying to run every facet of our lives. Don't these uber-liberals think we're smart enough to make our own decisions? Just because most left-wingers blindly follow their leader's commands, it doesn't mean there are people on the right who routinely think for themselves. I hope Monster wins its suit and gets millions. A city has no right to dictate how a company operates its business, as long as the product is legal.