Study Suggests Our Brains Have a 'Sixth Sense'
But it involves numbers, not ghosts
By Newsy, a Newser Video Partner
Posted Sep 7, 2013 12:15 PM CDT
Loading... Please wait

(Newser) – New research reveals people have a so-called "sixth sense." No, it’s not the ability to see dead people. Think more ... Rain Man. It’s referred to as “numerosity"—or number sense. Scientists have reportedly found a region of the brain that has a sort of “map” for perceiving numbers.

View 1 image

Newsy is a Newser content partner providing multisource video news. Its content is produced independently of Newser.
Copyright © 2016 Newsy.com, All rights reserved.

More From Newser
My Take on This Story
To report an error on this story,
notify our editors.
Study Suggests Our Brains Have a 'Sixth Sense' is...
4%
69%
2%
22%
2%
2%
Show results without voting
You Might Like
Comments
Showing 3 of 12 comments
codenameradical
Sep 9, 2013 3:36 PM CDT
First, it would be illogical to describe this as a sense. The ability to interpret what we take in is not a sense. The format of taking the information in is what we call a sense. Second, there are vastly more than 5 senses. The basic 5 is a long misassumed myth. Beyond the 5 we all know, you also have the ability to feel pressure, itch, where your body parts are, muscle tension, pain (there are 3 of these), balance, stretch (which is multiple as well, including lung fullness, bladder fullness, and stomach fullness), chemicals in the blood (hormones, toxins), thirst, hunger, magnetic fields (although weak in humans), and the passing of time. This may not be an exhaustive list, but it is certainly more than 5 (and I didn't include those 5).
Who_Cares
Sep 8, 2013 1:42 PM CDT
They call it also the "gut feeling", something that suppose to warn you when things aren't right. I wish, I had taken it seriously few times.
mehrheit
Sep 7, 2013 2:43 PM CDT
Newsy is not your source. That's like citing Newser as a source on your stories. One actual source: http://www.livescience.com/39441-is-numerosity-humans-sixth-sense.html More at NPR.