Nyad Defends Swim: I Had Right to Set Ground Rules
And it was a 'squeaky-clean'
By Kate Seamons, Newser Staff
Posted Sep 11, 2013 7:03 AM CDT
Diana Nyad, 64, greets her support team before her swim to Florida from Havana, Cuba, Saturday, Aug. 31, 2013.   (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa, File)

(Newser) – Cuba-to-Florida swimmer Diana Nyad answered skeptics quite literally last night, in a lengthy conference call between the new record holder and about a dozen members of the marathon swimming community. To the purists who questioned her gear, Nyad claimed the right to set the ground rules, noting the sport awards that honor to the first person to complete a crossing. Going forward, "Florida Straits Rules" will allow for the innovations she employed, including the full-body suit and prosthetic face mask she used to safeguard herself from jellyfish. Also on the rules list: No holding on to the boat or exiting the water, which Nyad insisted she didn't do.

"I swam. We made it, our team, from the rocks of Cuba to the beach of Florida, in squeaky-clean, ethical fashion," Nyad said, in response to those who questioned stretches where GPS data indicates her speed dramatically increased. The AP reports she pledged to hand over the observations and notes recorded by her navigator and two official observers, which one swimmer on the call described as "a great first step." Nyad also clarified an earlier misstatement: A published report from her doctors said she went seven hours without drinking; she in fact never went more than 45 minutes without water.

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Showing 3 of 23 comments
boxcar
Sep 16, 2013 2:24 AM CDT
Anyone ever hear of the "Gulf Stream"? Similar ocean currents must exist between Cuba & Florida Keys
Greatminds2012
Sep 11, 2013 11:21 AM CDT
I thought I read where she cheated.
arclight6970
Sep 11, 2013 11:20 AM CDT
I guess when someone sets a world record at the next Olympics we need to say "they made it too fast" while the entire observing world looks on. That said they must have doctored the live coverage to cover up the cheating that was going on. As another poster stated the entire support team would have to be convinced to look the other way while she cheated, then have not one of them make the claim she cheated to gain their own 15 minutes of fame. So far that has not happened but maybe someone can be convinced to crack if some media outlet offers them enough money to flip on her accomplishment for the story that would be "created". What makes me believe she really made it was her repeated attemps and determination, unless you call that cheating.