Nonverbal Autistic Boy Stuns Mom, Sings Katy Perry
8-year-old had never uttered more than single words previously
By Newser Editors, Newser Staff
Posted Nov 15, 2013 4:10 PM CST
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(Newser) – An autistic boy in Texas who had never strung together more than a few words is now a bit of a YouTube sensation for doing far more than that. Jack Robbins, 8, stunned his parents when he began regularly singing the lyrics to Katy Perry's song "Roar" around the house, reports BuzzFeed. Mom Carla made a video of it, which quickly went viral. “I was completely amazed and so excited,” she says, reports Today.com. “For all these years, I’ve cooked for him, I put things on him, I dress him. I don’t know if he likes them or hates them. This is huge for me to finally know something that he likes.” See the Stir for more.

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Showing 3 of 8 comments
coolsmoothla
Nov 16, 2013 7:20 AM CST
AHHHHH .. the power of music!!!! ... now y'all know why I love posting music with my comments ... music is a universal and very powerful language ... it can make people, who don't understand what you're saying, understand what you're trying to say . ♪ take all of your wasted honor ... every little past frustration ... take all your so-called problems ... better put them in quotations.... SAY WHAT YOU NEED TO SAY ♫ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CQDOzE-kIsg
TerryStephenson
Nov 15, 2013 6:58 PM CST
That really is pretty damn cool.
Scott603
Nov 15, 2013 6:34 PM CST
I have a non-verbal 8 year old daughter. One day at 4 years old she sat up and said "1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10" Now it is 4 years later and she's still non-verbal, so the fact that this kid is singing is incredibly encouraging, but.... it doesn't necessarily mean that he's about to increase his expressive language (although he may). He probably does have quite a bit of receptive language. My daughter understands an awful lot of what we tell her. I wrote some software with symbols that she uses to communicate, she can ask for various kinds of food, ask to be tickled, go to the playground, etc. Basically, the tablet gives her a voice.