GM Names First Female CEO

Mary Barra has been at company since she was a co-op student in 1980

By Kevin Spak,  Newser Staff

Posted Dec 10, 2013 8:49 AM CST

(Newser) – In something of a surprise move, General Motors CEO Dan Akerson will announce his resignation today, and name Mary Barra as his successor, making her the first woman to pilot the auto giant, according to multiple reports. Barra started at GM as an engineering co-op student way back in 1980, and has since risen to product development chief, according to the AP. Bloomberg adds that she started out at the same Pontiac plant her father worked at for 39 years.

Barra got the job heading up vehicle development in early 2011, less than six months into Akerson's tenure, and oversaw, among other vehicles, the Chevy Impala, the first US sedan to take top Consumer Reports honors in 20 years, and the Cadillac CTS, Motor Trend's car of the year. The move comes immediately after the Treasury sold its remaining shares in the automaker, and Businessweek thinks that, coupled with Akerson's departure, signals the end of an era. Akerson and Uncle Sam took GM from the brink of annihilation to 15 straight profitable quarters.

Mary Barra, General Motors Senior Vice President, Global Product Development, introduces the 2013 Buick Encore at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Jan. 10, 2012.
Mary Barra, General Motors Senior Vice President, Global Product Development, introduces the 2013 Buick Encore at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Jan. 10, 2012.   (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
Mary Barra, General Motors Senior Vice President, Global Product Development speaks at media previews for the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Monday, Jan. 14, 2013.
Mary Barra, General Motors Senior Vice President, Global Product Development speaks at media previews for the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Monday, Jan. 14, 2013.   (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
« Prev« Prev | Next »Next » Slideshow
My TakeCLICK BELOW TO VOTE
24%
5%
0%
63%
1%
7%
To report an error on this story, notify our editors.

NEWS FROM OUR PARTNERS
Other Sites We Like:   The Street   |   24/7 Wall St.   |   BuzzFeed   |   Cracked   |   World History Project   |   POPSUGAR Tech   |   Business Insider   |   HuffPost Entertainment