Barnes & Noble Axes Nook Engineers
But denies report that it fired all of them
By Kevin Spak, Newser User
Posted Feb 10, 2014 1:54 PM CST
In this Monday, Oct. 28, 2013 file photo, Barnes & Noble's e-reader, Nook GlowLight, is demonstrated in New York.   (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)

(Newser) – Barnes & Noble's Nook was already on death's door, and things look even more grim today after news broke that the company had laid off the tablet's hardware engineers. Initially, Business Insider reported that the company had fired its entire engineering staff for the product. The company later told Ars Technica that wasn't true, and that it hadn't laid off all the engineers, but it didn't provide specific numbers, and confirmed that there had been bloodletting.

"As we've aligned Nook's cost structure with business realities, staffing levels in certain areas of our organization have changed, leading to some job eliminations," a spokesperson said, adding that the company was still committed to the tablet. But Kwame Opam at The Verge thinks "the writing is on the wall" for the Nook, given that sales dropped 66.7% year-over-year this holiday season.

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Showing 3 of 13 comments
Ezekiel 25:17
Feb 14, 2014 8:38 PM CST
School districts in Texas switching to custom manufactured tablets. Textbook authors love it because they can update more often. The people at Pearson, McGraw, and Reed are not exactly craps and giggles. Bookstores are not happy about it. Colleges flat refuse to make the switch for financial reasons. I worked at a state owned bookstore in 1998 as the IT director for the entire university center. It included the store, copy shop, convenience store, food court, campus bank, housing office, parking office, banquet services, and outreach office. The bookstore alone brought in $1.5M to the university in book sales per year. But when public k-12 schools make the switch, they save hundreds of thousands over just a few years.
TessTalks
Feb 10, 2014 8:38 PM CST
Why do people need a "gadget" to read a book? It's Barnes & Noble for god's sake, just read a fu%king actual BOOK.
gomer99
Feb 10, 2014 5:49 PM CST
B&N shot itself in the foot when it followed iCrap and Kindle in RESTRICTING access to the web by its tabs. I bought five refurbed Nook Color's for $90 each at WalMart, rooted each one with a $14 chip from Amazon, and have five SUPERB Jelly Bean Tablets for $104 -- one for each g-kid and one for me. If B&N did that, in the first place, they would have cornered the tab market. Ya gets what ya deserves.......