Google Admits It: We Suck at Diversity
Numbers prove 'Silicon Valley remains a white man's world,' says NYT
By Arden Dier, Newser Staff
Posted May 29, 2014 10:08 AM CDT
Software engineers work in a cluster of desks at Google Inc.'s new campus in Kirkland, Wash., Wednesday, Oct. 28, 2009.   (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

(Newser) – Google may have just topped the list of companies with the best compensation and benefits, but it's admitting it isn't a frontrunner when it comes to diversity. The company has finally shown its hand when it comes to race and gender numbers, owning up to the fact that it's "miles away" from where it should be. Of Google's 46,170 employees, 70% are men and 61% are white, the company reveals in a blog post. Black people make up just 2% of the workforce, Hispanics just 3%. "Put simply, Google is not where we want to be when it comes to diversity," the senior VP of people operations says. NBC News notes the company wasn't required to release the data, and other tech companies haven't done the same.

Further, 30% of Google's US workforce is Asian, while men hold 83% of technical jobs and whites make up 72% of leadership roles. The numbers "offer a stark glance at how Silicon Valley remains a white man's world," the New York Times reports, but as the senior VP explains, "Being totally clear about the extent of the problem is a really important part of the solution." Google didn't comment on how it would boost diversity, but the Times notes the company has in the past attempted to recruit women by offering perks like lengthy maternity leaves. Plus, part of the problem comes from the pipeline: Last year, across eight states, no Hispanic students took the Advanced Placement computer science test; in 12 states, no black students took it, either.

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Ezekiel 25:17
May 30, 2014 3:51 PM CDT
Universities, bastions of equality and diversity have a deep dark secret told me by the program director of a local African and American Studies Program. This is the lady who leads the general graduation march every other year. Its rotated alphabetically every year form A-Z, Z-A. The AAS program graduates around 200 kids each fall and 50 in December. She told me something interesting. She said that companies and universities will send hiring agents to Africa to hire job candidates for really nice corporate positions. She said her univeristy sent people to Africa to hire faculty and chair positions. The idea is that the American Black diaspora is a weakness. It leads to preconceived notions of what a Black person is in the USA. The idea is that Black educated individuals come along with a trainload of issues they are hauling into the workplace and university position. You go and hire an African from an African nation, you get absolutely none of that Black American bias. She said it was alarming to see it happen and she did not have a solution to it becuase on the other side of the coin, she thought it was great that graduates in African nations were getting nice jobs in the USA. But on the other side of that coin (the edges), the companies were getting diversity grants and credit from the Labor entities for doing it when its not really a true diversity hire situation. She said it would be hard for her to oppose the practice and not look herself racist. I know what she is saying. We had to hire three different Black people to get to one who could do the job. The first one just challenged us to fire him and not face a race based suit. But we were able to amass a list of things he did to warrant firing and only when he was finally given a last warning did we send him down the road walking (he did not own a car and getting to work late everyday was one of the issues.)
heretoday
May 30, 2014 9:03 AM CDT
"The numbers "offer a stark glance at how Silicon Valley remains a white man's world,"" It was white males, mostly geeks women shunned, aided by Asians that built silicon valley and made it what it is today. Then the women, blacks and Hispanics want their cut after the works been done.
Scott603
May 29, 2014 3:20 PM CDT
First.... Racism is quite real and alive. A black friend of mine reserved a hotel room for herself and her boyfriend at a fancy hotel in South Carolina. When she arrived at the hotel they suddenly had "no record of her reservation in the computer" and offered to help find her another room somewhere else because "they were fully booked." She went out to her car and called the hotel from her cell phone and asked if they had any available rooms for that evening and they said "Yes, plenty." An Indian friend of mine was taking pictures of the Leonard Zakim bridge in Boston and the Boston Police came, arrested him in front of his relatives, and brought him to the police station for an hour of questioning, for standing on a public sidewalk taking pictures of an interesting looking bridge. A woman I know went into a business in Massachusetts and was told by the owner they preferred not to have black customers and asked her to leave. And 60 minutes did a story where they sent equally qualified white and black candidates to job interviews and the white people were offered the jobs at a stunningly higher rate. Second... Due to years of racism and local funding for schools, we have impoverished inner city black neighborhoods with bad schools, where the kids see little in the way of hope. There are some very upper class black neighborhoods in America, and if you go there you'll find kids talking about going to Les Mis, what they are working on for the science fair, how their French improved on their trip to Paris, etc. Hell, if you go to Legal Seafoods in Braintree Massachusetts, 60% of the customers are black people in suits talking about cardiology, making partner at the law office, etc. The problem is that we need to break cycles of poverty, lack of education and lack of hope in inner cities, northern Maine, Appalachia, etc.