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18-Foot Weeds Taking Over Brooklyn Park
Local group asks for volunteers to help chop away pesky, unsightly phragmites
By Jenn Gidman, Newser Staff
Posted Aug 7, 2014 3:30 PM CDT
Prospect Park in Brooklyn is being overrun with pesky phragmites like these.   (Shutterstock)

(Newser) – If you happen to be in the NYC area on Aug. 16 and 23 and aren't afraid to trudge through sediment-filled water, the Prospect Park Alliance has a task: chopping down the weeds—some of them as high as 18 feet—that are proliferating in the park. As part of its "Fight the Phrag" campaign, the Brooklyn alliance is handing out rubber wading outfits, plywood planks, and black plastic to volunteers so they can smother the phragmite reeds, which mess with the park's ecosystem, disrupt wildlife, and ruin views of Brooklyn's only lake, reports DNAInfo.com. "It's hard to get rid of them," an alliance spokeswoman says. "Many native animals do not feed on phragmites, so it makes the reed virtually useless and a nuisance."

The weeds are a "cosmopolitan species," according to NYC Parks—meaning they grow everywhere in the world—but for some reason they've been shooting up like crazy in the Northeast in recent years. Cornell University Cooperative Extension is slightly harsher in its assessment of the wild growth, labeling it as an "invasive species" that "[turns] rich habitats into monocultures devoid of the diversity needed to support a thriving ecosystem." The black tarp will be left over the weeds for a year to deprive them of light, then removed so the alliance can grow new native plants, notes DNAInfo. (Guess we could call in the goats if local manpower isn't enough.)

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Showing 3 of 18 comments
Riffran
Aug 8, 2014 5:31 PM CDT
looks like what we call "Georgia cane" or giant reed... Cattle can't eat it, unless its the very young shoots...has toxic properties. Makes great woodwind reeds though.
hank10303
Aug 8, 2014 2:31 PM CDT
I hope they have the sense to recycle the cut weeds as compose.
QuestionAll
Aug 8, 2014 3:46 AM CDT
The town I live has a rule about over grown yards. If I let my yard go, I could be citied and fined for it. The city has cut back on services and does not mow as often as it used too. So now there are some areas that have grass and weeds tall enough tobe citied if it was me. But they get away with it, because it is city property. In other words, "do as I say, not as I do".