Some Ferguson Grand-Jury Records Were Kept Secret
Certain witness interviews withheld from public as feds continue investigation
By Jenn Gidman,  Newser Staff
Posted Dec 8, 2014 7:43 AM CST
Updated Dec 8, 2014 7:51 AM CST
Brown family attorney Daryl Parks points to a diagram produced during a second autopsy done on Michael Brown, Aug. 18, 2014, in St. Louis County, Mo.   (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

(Newser) – "As I have promised, the evidence presented to the grand jury, with some exceptions, and the testimony of the witnesses called to the grand jury will be released at the conclusion of this statement." Those were St. Louis Prosecutor Robert McCulloch's words at the Nov. 24 press conference where he announced there would be no indictment for Darren Wilson for killing Michael Brown, CNN reports. And although much evidence has been made public, the "with some exceptions" part of McCullough's statement is also holding true. KSDK conducted a thorough review of the info that's been made available and discovered "several key documents" are still under wraps, including a two-hour interview with Dorian Johnson, who was with Brown when he was shot.

McCullough's office admits to keeping some of the paperwork private at the request of feds who are still looking into whether Brown's civil rights were violated, saying the office "turned over and relinquished control" of certain FBI interviews. In addition to Johnson's MIA joint federal-county interview, KDSK also found that only 24 witness interviews with law enforcement have been released, even though documents indicate up to 64 different witnesses were interviewed. The Justice Department hasn't commented on what it's still holding onto and why, but KSDK has filed a Freedom of Information Act request to take hold of all missing docs as soon as the feds are done with them. The Brown family could also ask for them if they file a civil lawsuit against Wilson or the Ferguson PD and then share those documents if they wish.
 

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