Louis, Meet Sarah: Apologies of the Week
Including a Kennedy, too
By Newser Editors,  Newser Staff
Posted Apr 18, 2015 11:29 AM CDT
Louis C.K. performs at the 8th Annual Stand Up For Heroes at Madison Square Garden last year.   (Photo by Brad Barket/Invision/AP)

(Newser) – A certain ESPN's reporter's apology following the release of an insult-filled video made the biggest headlines, but some other mea culpas surfaced this week:

  • Drunk-tweets: "I owe you an apology. ... I said some bad things about you."—Louis CK, to Sarah Palin, meeting her about five years after being "kinda drunk" and tweeting some, er, "comedic poetry" about her.
  • An analogy that never works: “I want to apologize to all whom I offended by my use of the word ‘holocaust’ to describe the autism epidemic."—Robert F. Kennedy Jr., after he went there in his criticism of vaccines.
  • Not actually an apology: "Anybody who knows me would never misinterpret the message of the photo my wife took in Miami that seems to have caused unexpected rage by some people. I do not court controversy. But I realize that a photo that was meant to be complimentary and lighthearted has turned into a questionable issue."—Michael Bublé, in a fine example of a celeb non-apology that was widely interpreted this week to be an actual apology, after he posted a photo on Instagram of a woman in short-shorts and immediately caught flak online.

  • Selling shirts: "We apologize, not just to Mr. Henley, but to anyone else who took offense. We have learned a valuable lesson and thank Mr. Henley for helping us appreciate the importance that he and other artists place in their publicity rights.” —Duluth Trading Co., to the Eagles' Don Henley, after advertising a henley shirt with the slogan “Don a Henley and Take It Easy.” The apology was court-ordered.
  • Personal foul: "I owe private apologies to a lot of people that I disappointed but a very public one to the Browns organization and the fans that I let down. I take full responsibility for my actions and it's my intention to work very hard to regain everyone's trust and respect."—Cleveland QB Johnny Manziel, upon leaving an addiction rehab facility, making the second such apology of his young career.