3 Really Detestable Wine Habits
'WSJ' columnist spells out things that drive her crazy when it comes to vino
By Newser Editors,  Newser Staff
Posted Jun 8, 2015 1:50 PM CDT
Well, then.   (Shutterstock)

(Newser) – Lettie Teague has some pet peeves when it comes to wine—ones that take away from wine's intended purpose, which is, obviously, "to bring pleasure, perhaps even joy," she writes in the Wall Street Journal. Three of Teague's major buzzkills:

  • "Wine-dumping waiters," as Teague puts it, probably won't succeed in getting her to order a second bottle by continually coming over to top off her glass. "The bottle is mine; I've ordered it and I will be paying for it soon … so I should be able to control how much or how little goes into my glass or the glass of my guest," she writes. She also hates a glass that's filled to the brim because she can't get her nose inside it or swirl it around without making a mess.

  • Another group that irks her: "pseudo-collectors," or the collectors she calls "the wine-world equivalent of serial daters." They're the ones who never get to really know a wine region or type of wine, instead jumping from popular wine to popular wine, letting name and score dictate their choices more than actually enjoying a particular wine they then take the time to learn about. "They like the thrill of the chase but not the commitment," Teague sniffs.
  • Even the most amateur epicure knows that wine temperature is critical, but Teague still finds a lot of people are getting it wrong. She notes that "white wines should be served chilled, red wines should be cool," and recalls an instance when she was about to place an ice cube (for just five seconds or so, mind you) in her glass of red to the chagrin of a "horrified" bystander. "You do know that wine is red?" he gasped, according to Teague. "Yes, indeed I did, I assured him. He kept his distance the rest of the night, and kept right on drinking his nice, warm glass of red wine."
Read four more things that vex Teague when it comes to vino in the Wall Street Journal.