Accused Rapist Spills on Prep School's Sexual Conquest Rite
Older students take 'great pride' in stealing younger ones' virginity: ex-prefect
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Aug 17, 2015 10:13 AM CDT
The entrance to the elite St. Paul's School is seen Friday in Concord, NH.   (Jim Cole)
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(Newser) – St. Paul's School boasts a glittering roster of alumni that includes senators, congressmen, a Nobel laureate, and the current secretary of state. The elite prep school also allegedly has a sordid tradition of sexual conquest in which graduating boys try to take the virginity of younger girls before getting their diplomas. Details of a practice authorities say was called the "Senior Salute" were spelled out in stark terms by a former prefect at the New Hampshire school, who's charged with raping a 15-year-old girl on the roof of a campus building in May 2014. Owen Labrie, now 19, has pleaded not guilty to several felonies and talked openly about the tradition when he was interviewed by Concord police. On a campus where upperclassmen studiously avoid their younger peers in most settings, Labrie told a detective some students "take great pride" in having sex with younger students before they leave school.

Labrie also told the detective about a contest where boys compete to "score" with the most girls, keeping a running tally written in marker on a wall behind washing machines. (The school kept painting over it, so it eventually was moved online.) A student leader honored at graduation —two days after the alleged assault — with the Rector's Award for "selfless devotion to school activities," Labrie was accepted to Harvard, but the school has said he's no longer enrolled. He told the detective he's tried to educate other students not to engage in "Senior Salute" and that the school wasn't doing enough to curtail the tradition. "The school has to put its foot down on this culture," Labrie is quoted in a police affidavit. "It's not healthy." The school's rector emailed the AP that "breaches of school policies or the trust upon which they are founded are addressed swiftly and judiciously." He declined to address questions about "Senior Salute."