Drunk Kid Designed a Whole Aircraft, Forgot
Meanwhile, his roommate's tweet about his inebriated exploit has gone viral
By Jenn Gidman,  Newser Staff
Posted Sep 9, 2015 4:39 PM CDT
Updated Sep 12, 2015 9:05 AM CDT
Screenshot from Keith Fraley's tweet about the design his roommate "Mark" came up with.   (Twitter)

(Newser) – Most people who've slammed rum and vodka drinks all night end up in slurred conversations about the meaning of life, drunk texting, or just passing out. But a second-year student at Michigan Technological University says he witnessed his trashed roommate do something a little more unusual late Saturday: design an entire aircraft, with no memory of it in the morning, the Guardian reports. Keith Fraley, 19, tells the paper that "Mark" (who doesn't want to use his real name in case future employers don't approve of his drinking adventures) stumbled into their room at about 11:30pm to grab some textbooks, returning minutes later for his whiteboard. Around 1:30am he was back, rambling "like a slurred robot" about his creation, which he described as an ekranoplan, a "ground effect" vehicle that hovers over water.

The guys Mark was drinking with as he "frantically" whipped up his aerospace math calculations tell Fraley that Mark was "very intoxicated" and "was passing out on his whiteboard from time to time" as he worked. Amazingly, Mark says he can't recall a thing: He woke up the next morning "basically questioning his sanity because of the immense amount of work that was in front of him," Fraley says. The tweet Fraley sent out about his roomie's feat—in which he marvels, "so my roommate came back drunk last night and doesnt remember designing an entire f---ing airplane"—has also taken off, with more than 81,000 retweets and 133,000 favorites so far. Responses range from critiques of the design to admiration to outright envy, with one commenter tweeting, "I need to know WTF he was drinking!!" But would the aircraft actually function? Fraley tells the Guardian: "Mark says ... he looks forward to trying to re-create his work into a remote-control model with his colleagues." (Maybe a wasted engineer designed this "evil" airplane seat.)
 

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
43%
13%
3%
27%
3%
10%