Suspect in Prof's Murder Left Note: 'I Am So Sorry'
Apology was for alleged murder of girlfriend
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Sep 15, 2015 2:26 PM CDT
Delta State University students cross state Highway 8 under police escort to go to their dorms as the Cleveland, Miss., school remains under lockdown following the campus shooting of history professor...   (Rogelio V. Solis)
camera-icon View 13 more images

(Newser) – The university instructor accused of killing his girlfriend and a colleague called police telling them he killed the woman at the home they shared in Mississippi, where investigators found a note of apology, police said today. Police in Gautier said they found a note reading: "I am so sorry I wish I could take it back. I loved Amy and she is the only person who ever loved me." Shannon Lamb did not indicate a motive for the killing of Amy Prentiss, 41, nor did he suggest he planned to hurt anyone else. After Lamb told them he killed Prentiss, he killed professor Ethan Schmidt, 39, inside his office at Delta State University, police said. Police have not released a motive for either shooting. University President William LaForge said he didn't know of any conflict between Lamb and Schmidt but "obviously there was something in Mr. Lamb's mind."

Lamb, who killed himself as police closed in on him during a manhunt, was described as a well-liked teacher, a musician and a father, but also someone who had medical problems and recently asked for a leave of absence from teaching due to a health issue of some sort. Lamb started working at the university in 2009 and taught geography and education classes; he received a doctorate in education in the spring. He was teaching two online classes this semester, but an in-person class had been cancelled, LaForge said. Lamb's career prospects at Delta State may have taken a turn because of a university policy change. After LaForge became president, he hired a new provost, Charles McAdams, who ended a prior university practice whereby an instructor who earned a doctorate could automatically join the tenure track and become an assistant professor. LaForge said that practice violated state policy which requires an open search for new professor positions.