White House Will Appeal Immigration Case to Supreme Court
After an appeals court keeps Obama plan from moving forward
By Jenn Gidman,  Newser Staff
Posted Nov 10, 2015 6:50 AM CST
Updated Nov 10, 2015 11:00 AM CST
President Barack Obama speaks to the International Association of Chiefs of Police in Chicago, Oct. 27, 2015.   (Antonio Perez/Chicago Tribune via AP)

(Newser) – Last November, President Obama laid out his immigration plan, which included protection against deportation for millions of undocumented people. Since then, Texas has been leading a slew of states trying to block the executive action, which was dealt another blow Monday when a federal appeals court sided with a lower court's order to block the programs from taking effect, the Hill reports. In a split decision, a three-judge panel of the 5th US Circuit Court of Appeals said the Lone Star State and 25 others looked likely to emerge victorious in their suit against the Obama administration. "We affirm the preliminary injunction because the states have standing; they have established a substantial likelihood of success on the merits," Judge Jerry Smith wrote. On Tuesday morning, the White House announced it would ask the Supreme Court to overturn the ruling, reports the Washington Post.

“The Department of Justice remains committed to taking steps that will resolve the immigration litigation as quickly as possible,” says a Justice Department spokesperson. He spoke after Texas AG Ken Paxton lauded the federal court's decision, noting in a statement cited by the New York Times that "Texas, leading a charge of 26 states, has secured an important victory to put a halt to the president’s lawlessness." Obama's initiative would offer a reprieve for up to 5 million undocumented immigrants who met eligibility requirements, the Hill notes. The White House hopes that the Supreme Court could take the case in the spring and make a decision in June. If it sides with the White House, that means the program could begin before Obama leaves office. (Donald Trump's immigration plan isn't faring well with some critics.)