Planned Parenthood Foe Sued for Being Too Loud
He's facing a restraining order and $5,000 fine
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Nov 10, 2015 2:57 PM CST
Anti-abortion activists protest in front of Planned Parenthood in Michigan. One protester is in hot water after protesting too loudly in front of a Planned Parenthood in Maine.   (Crystal Vander Weit/Kalamazoo Gazette-MLive Media Group via AP) ALL LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; LOCAL TELEVISION INTERNET OUT; MANDATORY CREDIT)

(Newser) – Maine's attorney general said Tuesday that she has sued a protester who she says yelled so loudly outside a Planned Parenthood facility that he disrupted health care services there. Janet Mills filed the complaint against Brian Ingalls, 26, under the state's civil rights act. Mills said he violated the rights of patients at the Portland facility on Oct. 23 when the sound of his voice directed to the second floor disrupted counseling sessions between staff and patients. A police officer warned Ingalls, a frequent protester outside the clinic, to stop yelling so loudly, but he did not, the complaint said. Mills said that Ingalls had the right to protest but that the Maine Civil Rights Act makes clear it's a violation to intentionally make noise at a volume that can be heard within a medical treatment facility.

"While protesters have every right to say anything they want in a public area in the vicinity of a medical facility, they are not permitted to disrupt another citizen's health care services," Mills said. Mills' lawsuit asks the court to prevent Ingalls from coming within 50 feet of Planned Parenthood facilities and order him to pay up to $5,000 for violating the Maine Civil Rights Act. Ingalls' attorney, Erin Kuenzig, said it's a "baseless lawsuit" filed to circumvent a US Supreme Court ruling about protester buffer zones. The lawsuit comes a few weeks after the city of Portland settled a lawsuit filed by anti-abortion activists against an ordinance that established a protest-free buffer zone around the clinic. The US Supreme Court ruled in 2014 that similar buffer zones in Massachusetts violated free speech rights.
 

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