Badly Timed ISIS Tweet Ends Minnesota Campaign
Group 'isn't necessarily evil,' just doing what's 'best for their community': pol
By Jenn Gidman,  Newser Staff
Posted Nov 16, 2015 9:05 AM CST
Especially bad timing.   (Twitter, via Minneapolis Star Tribune)
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(Newser) – A day after Paris' horrific terror attacks (and the same day ISIS claimed responsibility), a member of Minnesota's DFL Party posted a tweet he now regrets. Per a screenshot via the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Burnsville's Dan Kimmel—who was running for the state House against a 22-year-old incumbent—posted, "ISIS isn't necessarily evil. It is made up of people doing what they think is best for their community. Violence is not the answer, though." Apparently that last part of the tweet wasn't enough to soften the rest of it, because people on social media jumped on him, as did DFL Party chief Ken Martin. In a DFL statement, Martin says Kimmel's comments "do not reflect the views of the Minnesota DFL and have no place in our party" and he asks Kimmel "to apologize to all the families who have been torn apart by the terrorist organization and their senseless violence."

Kimmel initially tried to walk back his tweet, including with a follow-up post that read, per the Star Tribune: "I deplore evil acts of ISIS. I do not defend their acts." But reports that House DFL Minority Leader Paul Thissen jumped into the fray Saturday with his own statement, in which he also called for a Kimmel apology, as well as an end to his House campaign. And that's exactly what Kimmel did Sunday, announcing he was ending his run (as well as his social media accounts, apparently). "My tweet … was … poorly worded and did not convey my intent," he wrote on his website. "I am very sorry for 'spreading ick' on other candidates and the DFL party. I will do everything I can to help resolve the issue: most likely the best thing for me to do is shut up. The tweet was stupid. I'm sorry." (ISIS says the Paris attacks were "miracles.")