Lunar Revelation: 5 Most Incredible Discoveries of the Week
Including dire-sounding antibiotic news and bad news for Cinderella
By Newser Editors,  Newser Staff
Posted Jan 2, 2016 5:12 AM CST
In this Dec. 15, 2013, file photo taken by the onboard camera of the lunar probe Chang'e 3, China's moon rover "Jade Rabbit" touches the lunar surface.   (AP Photo/Xinhua, File)

(Newser) – A new moon discovery and a study on rape and college football make the list:

  • Stuck Rover Makes Big Find on the Moon: Malfunctions have kept China's Jade Rabbit from moving, but that hasn't stopped the lunar rover from making a major find. While exploring an impact crater, it discovered a whole new kind of moon rock, one with "unique compositional characteristics."
  • Rape Goes Up on College Football Days: Scientists have found a "robust" correlation between Division I football games and increased reports of rape. Crime data from the FBI was used to estimate that football games are behind an additional 253 to 770 rapes of college-age victims a year. Alcohol is implicated, too.

  • Science Has Bad News for Cinderella, Superman: Sorry Cinderella, you never would have married the handsome Prince. And Superman? Bringing Lois Lane back from the dead would have destroyed all life on Earth. It seems the science behind Cinderella's glass slipper and Superman's feat of turning back time by flying around the Earth falls short. Santa's got some trouble, too.
  • New Killer to Top Cancer by 2050: A new study says medicine-resistant infections will take more lives annually than cancer does by 2050—unless we do something about it. Deaths caused by drug resistance will rise from 700,000 in 2015 to an estimated 10 million per year in 2050, thanks to increased use of antibiotics. There's a suggestion being floated to fend off a possible "antibiotic apocalypse."
  • Irish Bones May Settle 'Archaeological Controversy': Given its location on the edge of Europe, the origins of the Irish have long fascinated archaeologists. Now, a study of ancient bodies—including a 5,200-year-old woman—is providing a better sense of where the nation's early settlers came from.
Click to read about more discoveries.