Your Guide to the Iowa Caucuses
The state is about to answer some big questions
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Feb 1, 2016 5:15 AM CST
Updated Feb 1, 2016 6:14 AM CST
A campaign staffer holds a leaflet with caucus information before a Saturday Trump rally at Clinton Middle School.   (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)
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(Newser) – The eyes of the world are once again on Iowa for caucus day—and this time, they're waiting to see whether all the Donald Trump hype translates into actual votes, and what will happen in the tightening Democratic race. Some coverage highlights:

  • The Des Moines Register has a refresher on how the state's caucus system actually works—and on the big difference between the Democratic and Republican procedures.
  • For Trump and Bernie Sanders alike, the most important factors will be turnout, turnout, and turnout, the Wall Street Journal reports.
  • AccuWeather is keeping an eye on a winter storm that could affect voting Monday evening, potentially changing the results.

  • Hillary Clinton had Bill and Chelsea at her side as she made her final pitch to Iowans, the Washington Post reports in a look at last-minute campaigning.
  • The Des Moines Register examines 10 questions the caucuses will answer, not including Trump's "How stupid are the people of Iowa?"
  • NBC News looks back at some weird moments from the Iowa caucuses of yesteryear, including the time a computer snafu gave George HW Bush a big lead over Ronald Reagan.
  • The New York Times looks at the most-watched pre-caucus poll—and explains why it has been so accurate in previous years.
  • Several other Election 2016 questions to be answered Monday include how either Trump or Ted Cruz handles losing, reports the Christian Science Monitor.
  • CNN reports on how potential kingmaker Martin O'Malley "is the most important Democrat in Iowa."
  • O'Malley will probably stay in the race at least until New Hampshire, but Iowa could be the end of the road for several GOP candidates who are "running on fumes," the Hill reports.
  • The Des Moines Register has some tips on how to follow results live as they come in Monday night—and a look at how the candidates stand on 27 different issues.

 

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