Obama May Release Top-Secret 9/11 Pages
Ex-senator leading push to declassify says 'all the evidence' points to Saudis
By Jenn Gidman,  Newser Staff
Posted Apr 25, 2016 8:03 AM CDT
President Barack Obama and Saudi Arabia's King Salman stand together for a photo during the Gulf Cooperation Council summit in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, on Thursday.   (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

(Newser) – It's long been speculated that Saudi Arabia played a major role in 9/11, and the so-called "28 pages" that have been locked up for years in the Capitol's basement may soon shed light on the matter if they are released by President Obama—a move that's now expected, the AP reports. The papers detail the findings of a congressional inquiry into what foreign entities provided support to the 9/11 hijackers while they planned the attacks. Former Sen. Bob Graham, who helped lead that inquiry, notes a White House official told him intel officers are reviewing the docs. "The most important unanswered question of 9/11 is: Did these 19 people conduct this very sophisticated plot alone, or were they supported?" he said on Sunday's Meet the Press, adding he finds it "implausible" they could have carried out such a plan without outside aid, per the Hill. "All the evidence points to Saudi Arabia," he said.

Graham isn't alone: The 28pages.org website has been lobbying for the pages to be brought "out of the shadows," while other lawmakers and some 9/11 victims' families are similarly quizzical regarding Saudi involvement. Then-President George W. Bush had ordered those pages stripped from the original 838-page report, warning that US intelligence secrets could be at risk. When asked how declassifying these pages would impact the strained relationship between the US and Saudi Arabia, Graham said "7.838" on a scale of 1 to 10, per the New York Daily News—i.e., a "high-level negative impact," as Chuck Todd put it. Saudi Arabia, meanwhile, says it's been "wrongfully and morbidly accused of complicity" and that it wants those 28 pages publicized so it could "respond to any allegations in a clear and credible manner." Graham says he expects an answer by June.