Desperate Marilyn Monroe Letter Up for Auction
She wrote to doctor about harrowing clinic experience
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted May 11, 2016 2:33 AM CDT
"I said to them, 'If you are going to treat me like a nut, I'll act like a nut,'" Monroe wrote.   (AP Photo, file)
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(Newser) – A carbon copy of a letter in which a troubled woman describes her enforced stay in a New York psychiatric clinic will be auctioned off this November—and since that woman is Marilyn Monroe, it's expected to sell for thousands of dollars. In the March 1961 letter to psychiatrist Ralph Greenson, the star describes how she broke glass in her "cell" to attract the attention of clinic staff, People reports. "I got the idea from a movie I made once called Don't Bother to Knock," she writes. "I picked up a light-weight chair and slammed it, and it was hard to do because I had never broken anything in my life—against the glass intentionally." She says she threatened to harm herself, but that was "the furthest thing from my mind at that moment since you know Dr. Greenson I'm an actress and would never intentionally mark or mar myself. I'm just that vain."

Monroe writes that the stay at the Payne Whitney Psychiatric Clinic, which her other psychiatrist committed her to, "had a very bad effect," and after the bid for attention, an administrator told her she was a "very, very sick girl" and had been so for a long time. After a few days, ex-husband Joe DiMaggio secured her release from the clinic. The following year, Greenson was the one who found her dead of a drug overdose in her Los Angeles home. The November auction of personal items Monroe left to acting mentor Lee Strasberg also includes taxi receipts, tax documents, a jewelry case once owned by DiMaggio, and an evening bag containing two 10-cent coins, eight Philip Morris cigarettes, and a used Revlon lipstick, reports Reuters. (Monroe's love letters were auctioned off in 2014.)
 

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