Clinton Ekes Out Welcome Win in Kentucky*
But margin is so close Sanders might be able to seek a recount
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted May 18, 2016 6:01 AM CDT
Bernie Sanders speaks at a Tuesday night rally in Carson, Calif.   (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)
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(Newser) – Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders will split the delegates from Kentucky's Democratic primary in a race so close that Sanders might be able to ask for a recount, the Lexington Herald Leader reports. The office of Kentucky Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes declared Clinton the "unofficial" winner late Tuesday with less than half of 1% separating the candidates. Sanders, who won Oregon by around 10% of the vote, with most precincts in, won most of Kentucky's rural counties, especially in coal country, while Clinton took the cities. A round-up of coverage:

  • A rep for Sanders, who had been favored to win Kentucky, tells the Washington Post that the campaign plans to take a closer look at the numbers Wednesday before deciding on a recount.

  • CNN reports that Kentucky results won't be official until May 31, and Sanders has a week to request a re-canvass, which will involve checking voting machines.
  • Sanders once again vowed to fight until the last ballot is cast on June 14, the Hill reports. "It will be a steep climb, I recognize that, but we have the possibility of going to Philadelphia with a majority of pledged delegates," he told a huge rally in Carson, Calif., Tuesday night.
  • Clinton could clinch the nomination June 7, when states including California vote, the New York Times notes, but Sanders plans to persuade superdelegates to support him because he will be stronger against Donald Trump.
  • The apparent win in Kentucky was a much-needed one for Clinton, and it is her only one this month, Politico notes. But she now faces more than two weeks of trying to compete with Trump and Sanders at the same time—and with Sanders now openly clashing with the party establishment, there is a stronger chance of a messy convention fight in July.
  • Trump, meanwhile, scored what the Oregonian calls an easy win in Oregon's GOP primary, made all the easier by the fact that all his opponents have dropped out. Still, almost a third of voters picked John Kasich or Ted Cruz, who were still on the ballot.

 

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