Poll: Patriotism Is at Its Lowest This Century
Just 52% 'extremely proud' to be American
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Jul 4, 2016 3:54 AM CDT
Nick Church, of England, takes his Oath of Allegiance at a naturalization ceremony Friday, July 1, 2016, in Atlanta.    (AP Photo/David Goldman)
camera-icon View 2 more images

(Newser) – Americans are a proud people but they're no longer bursting with patriotism the way they were earlier this century, according to the latest Gallup poll. Some 52% of respondents said they were "extremely proud" to be an American, which is the lowest rate recorded this century. The rate was 54% months before the 9/11 attacks, after which patriotism surged, with 70% saying they were "extremely proud" by 2003. In the latest poll, another 29% said they were "very proud" to be American and 13% "moderately proud." Some 5% told pollsters they were "only a little proud" of their country, and 1% weren't proud at all.

Patriotism dipped in 2006 then held steady until 2013, when it tumbled a few more points, the Washington Times notes. According to Gallup, "Americans’ continued frustration with national conditions—likely tied to their concern about the economy and lack of faith in public institutions—is probably one reason patriotism is at a recent low point." As in 2001, liberals, Democrats, nonwhites, college grads, and people 18 to 29 years old are less likely than average to say they are extremely proud to be American. But in a shift from 2001, people 50 to 64 are now, on average, more proud of their county than the over-65s. (Budweiser is temporarily renaming itself "America.")
 

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
8%
13%
45%
16%
5%
12%