8 Things to Know on the 29th Annual Pi Day
It's a great day to celebrate with math...or pie
By Michael Harthorne,  Newser Staff
Posted Mar 14, 2017 12:45 PM CDT
Shrink
   (Getty Images/DNY59)

(Newser) – Tuesday is Pi Day, the only holiday that caters exclusively to math nerds who love puns and baked goods. Pi is the ratio of a circle's circumference to its diameter, a never-ending number that begins 3.14—hence it being honored on March 14. Here are eight things to know on this, the 29th annual Pi Day:

  • Because pi is a never-ending number, it contains pretty much every combination of digits imaginable. Time has created a program that scans the first million digits of pi to find your birthday (or any other date).
  • NPR has a list of pie recipes for Pi Day, including granola cranberry walnut pie and something called Pimp My Mince Pie.
  • For people more excited about the math part of Pi Day than the pie part, NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has a set of space-related math problems involving the famous number, according to Space.com.
  • A lot of businesses around the country are offering Pi Day deals, and ABC News has a list of them from the likes of Zazzle, Whole Foods, and Pizza Hut.
  • CNET, which even changed its logo in honor of Pi Day, has a slideshow of historical events that occurred on Pi Days past, including the death of Karl Marx and the patenting of the cotton gin.
  • Pi Day is getting political this year, with more than 1,200 workers from Google, Apple, and Facebook using it as an occasion to protest President Trump. "On...Pi Day, let's show our tech leaders that they can not have their cake and eat it too," Fortune quotes one protest page as stating.
  • Back on the mathematics side of things, the Pew Research Center is celebrating Pi Day with facts about math education in the US, including that American students are now better at math than they were 20 years ago.
  • Finally, io9 is sick of pi hogging all the attention. It lists seven numbers that are "just as cool," making the case for both 0 and 1, plus some other numbers you probably aren't familiar with.

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
11%
24%
9%
37%
4%
15%