Martin Shkreli Has Some Unsavory Jail Mates
He's locked up in the same facility as mob and terrorism suspects
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Sep 15, 2017 7:06 PM CDT
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FILE - In this Jan. 8, 2017 file photo, the Metropolitan Detention Center (MDC) is shown in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Inmate No. 87850-053 has no internet. That could be the least of the inconveniences ahead for "Pharma Bro" Martin Shkreli, whose online rantings prompted a judge this week to...   (Kathy Willens)
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(Newser) – Inmate No. 87850-053 has no internet. The AP reports that could be the least of the inconveniences ahead for Martin Shkreli, whose online rantings about Hillary Clinton prompted a judge this week to revoke his bail and put him in the Metropolitan Detention Center, a fortress-like federal jail that also houses terrorism and mob suspects. MDC, as the Brooklyn lockup for 1,800 men and women is known, has over the years drawn complaints ranging from sexual assaults to the lack of fresh air, sunlight, and recreation. Federal prison officials wouldn't discuss Shkreli's conditions, though his lawyer says his client is in with the general population. All defense attorney Ben Brafman would say of Shkreli's two nights locked up so far is that he "is doing reasonably well under very difficult circumstances."

Shkreli, best known for jacking up the price of a life-saving drug, had been allowed to remain free on $5 million bail following his conviction last month in an unrelated securities fraud scheme involving two hedge funds he ran. But Shkreli's creepy Facebook posting offering a $5,000 bounty for a strand of Clinton's hair was the last straw for US District Judge Kiyo Matsumoto, who agreed with prosecutors that he should be put behind bars until his sentencing for securities fraud early next year. He is facing up to 20 years in prison on the most serious charges. But he had brashly predicted in livestreamed rants that he would never see the inside of a prison because of sentencing guidelines—and that even if he did get prison time, it would be just a few months at a minimum-security "Club Fed." "I'll play basketball and tennis and Xbox and be out on these streets in four months," he boasted to the New York Daily News just minutes after his conviction.

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