House, Senate Unveil Dueling Tax Plans
Senate plan calls for one-year delay in implementing major corporate tax cut
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Nov 9, 2017 3:39 PM CST
In this Feb. 27, 2017 file photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. meet with reporters outside the White House in Washington.   (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

(Newser) – Senate Republicans revealed the details of their sweeping tax legislation Thursday, including a one-year delay in plans for a major corporate tax cut despite strident opposition from the White House and others in their own party. Their bill would leave the prized mortgage interest deduction untouched for homeowners in a concession to the powerful real estate lobby but would ignore a House compromise on the hot-button issue of state and local tax deductions. On the other side of the Capitol, the House Ways and Means Committee approved its own version of the legislation on a party-line 24-16 vote. Changing the tax code is President Trump's top priority and a goal many Republicans believe has grown even more urgent in the wake of election losses on Tuesday that displayed an energized Democratic electorate, the AP reports.

Yet as the Senate Finance Committee unveiled its bill, a few stark differences emerged with the version approved by the House tax-writing committee, underscoring the challenges ahead in getting both chambers to agree on the complex and far-reaching legislation that would affect nearly every American. The Senate bill would fully repeal the state and local deduction claimed by many taxpayers, an idea that has drawn vigorous opposition from House Republicans in New York and New Jersey and resulted in a compromise in the House version of the bill that would allow property taxes to be deducted up to $10,000. On the other hand, the House bill would cap the mortgage interest deduction, an idea that caused intense blowback from the real estate lobby, but the Senate tax measure would leave it unchanged. Click for more on the similarities and differences between the House and Senate bills.

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
17%
21%
8%
4%
13%
37%