Landmark Cakeshop Case Reaches Supreme Court
Baker argues he shouldn't be forced to make wedding cake for gay couple
By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff
Posted Dec 5, 2017 5:34 AM CST
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In this Wednesday, Nov. 8, 2017, file photograph, Jack Phillips, owner of Masterpiece Cake, speaks during a rally on the campus of a Christian college in Lakewood, Colo.   (AP Photo/David Zalubowski, file)
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(Newser) – The Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments Tuesday in the Masterpiece Cakeshop vs. Colorado Civil Rights Commission case—a divisive and complicated case with ramifications that go far beyond the world of baked goods. Lower courts found Colorado baker Jack Phillips guilty of violating anti-discrimination laws when he refused to bake a wedding cake for a gay couple in 2012. He argues that as a Christian, he shouldn't be forced to create a cake that violates his religious beliefs. The case is seen as one that will set important precedents for both gay rights and religious freedom. Here's what you need to know:

  • The background. Just about the only thing the two sides agree on is that this case is about more than cake, the AP reports. LGBT activists say that victory for Phillips, who refused the cake request from Charlie Craig and Dave Mullins, would open the door to widespread discrimination. Phillips, who has the support of the Trump administration, argues that he is an artist, and artists should be free to choose what they will create and what they won't "without fear of being unjustly punished by the government."

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