24-Year-Old Trump Appointee Runs Into Resume Trouble

WaPo looks at inconsistencies on Taylor Weyeneth's resumes
By Newser Editors,  Newser Staff
Posted Jan 22, 2018 7:16 AM CST
Fog shrouds the dormant cherry trees around the ice-covered Tidal Basin with the Washington Monument in the distance, in Washington, Friday, Jan. 12, 2018.   (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

(Newser) – Some 24-year-olds are wunderkinds. The Washington Post clearly doesn't think Taylor Weyeneth belongs in that category. Weyeneth was a relative unknown until the Post on Jan. 14 ran a piece looking at the "rising star at the Office of National Drug Control Policy"—and the paltry resume that got him there. The office is tasked with overseeing billions of dollars in anti-drug campaigns and responding to the opioid epidemic, and the Week points out that it is short a "drug czar" at the moment, instead being helmed by longtime ONDCP employee Richard Baum. A Jan. 3 memo from Baum notes the exodus of talent and lack of a chief of staff, and says that position's tasks will be handled by Baum and the deputy chief of staff—Weyeneth. The Post reports the position was previously held by a lawyer; Weyeneth's sole post-grad experience was on the Trump campaign.

The paper sees his rise as due in part to the many staff vacancies, but digs into inconsistencies on his resumes; multiple versions were submitted to the government, with the second and third copies reportedly revised to correct errors. Among those errors: While attending St. John's University, Weyeneth worked as a legal assistant at the New York firm O'Dwyer & Bernstien; per his first resume, he was there until April 2016. But an FBI background check showed he had left eight months prior, and partner Brian O'Dwyer says Weyeneth was "discharged" because he "just didn't show" up. An official told the Post that a replacement for Weyeneth's position is being sought, after which Weyeneth would return to his previous role as White House liaison for ONDCP. The Post digs into other sticking points related to volunteer hours, a master's degree, and more here. (Read more Office of National Drug Control Policy stories.)

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