Parents 'Livid' After Teacher Was Fired for Saying 'I Do'
Jocelyn Morffi said to have violated contract requiring adherence to Catholic teachings
By Arden Dier,  Newser Staff
Posted Feb 12, 2018 8:43 AM CST
There is no state law in Florida prohibiting discrimination based on sexual orientation.   (Getty/GeoffGoldswain)

(Newser) – She married the love of her life and believes she was fired for it. Jocelyn Morffi, a first-grade teacher at Miami's Saints Peter and Paul Catholic School, was terminated Thursday, days after marrying her same-sex partner of two years, reports the Miami Herald. A friend says Morffi was told she had to resign Wednesday, her first day back at school since the Feb. 3 wedding, and was fired when she refused. Though Morffi says there's no question why she was terminated—"in their eyes I'm not the right kind of Catholic for my choice in partner," she writes on Instagram—some 20 parents arrived at the school Friday demanding answers. "We were extremely livid. They treated her like a criminal, they didn't even let her get her things out of her classroom," says one, noting Morffi "by far was one of the best teachers out there."

Morffi had worked at the school for almost seven years, coached basketball, and took students to deliver meals to the homeless on weekends, a friend says. She's "made such a contribution to the school. She never imposes her personal beliefs on others. She just does everything in love," says an "outraged" parent. Nonetheless, a spokesperson for the Archdiocese of Miami says Morffi violated her contract, which notes teachers may be fired for conduct "inconsistent" with Catholic teachings. Other teachers received verbal warnings simply for attending the wedding, reports ABC News. A mother tells the Herald she's withdrawing her child from the school as a result. Noting no state laws prohibit discrimination on sexual orientation, the director of a LGBT rights group says he hopes the "shocking" case will encourage people to fight for change.

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