Group Slams Trump's Character, Wants Liquor License Yanked

President doesn't pass character test required to hold license, group argues
By Arden Dier,  Newser Staff
Posted Sep 12, 2018 7:15 AM CDT
This Dec. 21, 2016 file photo shows the Trump International Hotel at 1100 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, in Washington.   (AP Photo/Alex Brandon, File)
camera-icon View 1 more image

(Newser) – A group calling President Trump a liar, fraudster, and racist say he shouldn't be allowed to serve booze at his hotel in Washington, DC. Two judges and five religious leaders are challenging the liquor license held by the Trump Hotel, as city law requires anyone selling wine, beer, or spirits to be "of good character." Based on racist statements, alleged misstatements of net worth, a payment to porn star Stormy Daniels, fraud claims against Trump University, and allegations of sexual assault by 16 women, the owner of license holder Trump Old Post Office LLC is not, the complainants said in a June filing, per Politico and HuffPost. In fact, the evidence of Trump's "amorality" builds daily, they wrote in a filing last week, mentioning Michael Cohen's admission of campaign finance violations and a New York Times op-ed describing a West Wing underground resistance to Trump.

Though the Alcohol Beverage Control Board has denied liquor licenses to individuals on the basis of character, including those who misrepresented their finances, it's "unusual" to review an existing license on the same basis, per Politico. Complainants, however, say Trump's "egregious conduct" warrants such a move. "The list is almost too long to name … from the complaint that his own lawyer has confessed to, to the sleeping around with so many women, to his racist actions," says one complainant, Rev. Timothy Tee Boddie, whose effort is funded by Arizona Republican Jerry Hirsch. The board meets Wednesday to decide whether to forward the complaint to DC Attorney General Karl Racine, who is suing Trump on allegations that he profits from foreign governments via the hotel. Should the case proceed, the board would hear arguments before issuing a decision. (Read more Washington DC stories.)

My Take on This Story
Show results without voting  |  
17%
4%
1%
43%
1%
35%