Smaller Babies Become Hostile Adults: Study

Low weight at birth and childhood linked to more hostility later in life

By Rob Quinn,  Newser Staff

Posted May 13, 2008 6:16 AM CDT

(Newser) – New research has linked low birth weight and slow growth in childhood to increased levels of hostility in adults, Reuters reports. Researchers also discovered that the higher levels of aggression were linked to health trouble, including coronary problems, type 2 diabetes and earlier death. The levels of hostility appeared unconnected to any other factors like gender, number of siblings or educational level.

"We interpret our findings as suggesting that hostility and cardiovascular disease may share a common vulnerability factor in fetal and early postnatal life," wrote the authors of the study, published in the journal Psychosomatic Medicine.

The researchers found higher hostility levels were linked to serious health problems in adults, including strokes and Type 2 diabetes.
The researchers found higher hostility levels were linked to serious health problems in adults, including strokes and Type 2 diabetes.   (Shutterstock)
People in the study with higher levels of hostility as adults had a lower body weight and smaller body mass index at birth.
People in the study with higher levels of hostility as adults had a lower body weight and smaller body mass index at birth.   (Getty Images)
Finnish researchers have linked low birth weight and slow growth in infancy to increased hostility in adults.
Finnish researchers have linked low birth weight and slow growth in infancy to increased hostility in adults.   (Shutterstock)
« Prev« Prev | Next »Next » Slideshow
To report an error on this story, notify our editors.

NEWS FROM OUR PARTNERS
Other Sites We Like:   The Street   |   MSN Living   |   PopSugar Tech   |   RealClear   |   24/7 Wall St.   |   Biography   |   Barstool Sports   |   OK!