Sentences That 'Evoke an Entire Universe'
Esquire celebrates some favorites it's seen over its first 75 years
By Will McCahill,  Newser Staff
Posted Jun 22, 2008 7:32 PM CDT
"The first time she drowned in the cold and glassy waters of Lake Turcot, Fleur Pillager was only a girl," Louise Erdrich wrote.   (AP Photo)
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(Newser) – Celebrating 75 years of fiction, Esquire offers some samples from "writers who could evoke an entire universe with a single sentence." A smattering:

  • "Now he would never write the things that he had saved to write until he knew enough to write them well," Ernest Hemingway, The Snows of Kilimanjaro, August, 1936.

  • "Any mention of pirates of the fair sex runs the immediate risk of awakening painful memories of the neighborhood production of some faded musical comedy, with its chorus line of obvious housewives posing as pirates and hoofing it on a briny deep of unmistakable cardboard," Jorge Luis Borges, The Widow Ching, Lady Pirate, August, 1972.
  • "The first time she drowned in the cold and glassy waters of Lake Turcot, Fleur Pillager was only a girl," Louise Erdrich, Fleur, August, 1986.
For the complete list, please click the link below.