Transistors May Migrate to Paper
Circuit-carrying cellulose undercuts silicon on price
By Wesley Oliver,  Newser Staff
Posted Oct 20, 2008 1:49 AM CDT
When linked together on the surfaces of silicon chips, transistors form the "logic gates" that do the calculations in computers, mobile phones and TV sets.   (AP Photo)
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(Newser) – The future of electronics may be etched on paper, reports the Economist. Researchers have found a cheaper, easier way to make transistors using cellulose, paper’s key ingredient. Paper could soon replace silicon as a surface on which to mount transistors, which control the flow of electric currents and power most gadgets.

Traditionally, transistors are linked on silicon chips to form “logic gates.” But cellulose-based transistors could be used to cheaply tag items such food labels, banknotes and postage stamps. Paper transistors won’t replace the silicon chips in computer microprocessors until they can be miniaturized.