study

Stories 1 - 20 |  Next >>

Scientists Spot Stage 1 Cancers Via Blood Test

Earlier treatment could save millions of lives

(Newser) - Human blood is rich with genetic material, and scientists have in recent years taken many steps forward in decoding it. The latest announcement—that a blood test can spot cancer at its earliest stages—has the potential to save millions of lives as treatment is administered earlier in the disease'... More »

Breakthrough in Search for Peanut Allergy Cure

New study found 80% of subjects could still tolerate peanuts 4 years later

(Newser) - Could a cure for peanut allergies be close? Australia's ABC reports that in a new study , 82% of participants saw their peanut allergies cured within the first 18 months of treatment. Four years later, 80% of the participants still showed no signs of an allergy, and 70% passed a... More »

'Frankenstein' Dinosaur Transforms Evolutionary Tree

Chilesaurus bridges two major dino groups, scientists say

(Newser) - Like the theropod dinosaur T. rex, Chilesaurus stood upright, with strong hind legs and shorter front limbs. But its flat teeth were more closely related to ornithischians like triceratops and stegosaurus. That's just one thing that irked scientists when Chilesaurus was named a theropod following its discovery in Chile... More »

Big Breakthrough Could Mean Pig Organs in Humans

Scientists who've created genetically modified piglets say perhaps in 2 years

(Newser) - Pig organs have long been eyed as transplant options for humans, as the organs are about the same size and pigs are plentiful, but it's been challenging to overcome the human immune system's possible rejection of such organs. Now, in what one medical expert tells the New York ... More »

A Virginia Driver Is Masquerading as a Car Seat

It's part of a Virginia Tech study of autonomous cars

(Newser) - It's still a couple of months until Halloween, but some in Arlington, Va., are already dressing up—as car seats. An NBC Washington reporter spotted a seemingly autonomous van driving around Arlington on Monday. On closer inspection, he realized there actually was a driver—the man was just disguised... More »

Almost Everyone Thinks Atheists Are the Worst

'Atheists are broadly perceived as potentially morally depraved and dangerous': study

(Newser) - When given a hypothetical scenario describing a fictional character who progresses from torturing animals as a child to murdering homeless people as an adult, most people assume that this person is an atheist—and that includes atheists themselves. That's what researchers at the University of Kentucky in Lexington are... More »

Women's Brains More Active Than Men's in 2 Key Areas

Those managing self-control and focus, as well as mood disorders

(Newser) - In the latest "men are from Mars, women are from Venus" debate, neuroscience jumps into the fray. In what UPI deems the "largest functional brain imaging survey ever," researchers from California's Amen Clinics used a type of 3D imaging to determine that women's brains are... More »

How Being Lonely Can Be as Bad for Your Health as Smoking

And social isolation and loneliness may carry even more mortality risk than obesity

(Newser) - Being lonely won't just make you feel sad—it may also endanger your life. In fact, researchers now say that people steeped in social isolation (including those who live by themselves) and a lack of connection with others can suffer just as much of a mortality risk as someone... More »

Mediterranean Diet Has a Downside

The rich, well-educated benefit the most, study says

(Newser) - Despite its many purported advantages , the Mediterranean diet might not be all it's cracked up to be. According to a new study in the International Journal of Epidemiology , its effects depend largely on socioeconomic status. Researchers surveyed 19,000 people ages 35 and over in Italy, giving each a... More »

Sleep More Than 9 Hours? You May Have More Nightmares

Oxford researchers tie bad dreams to too much sleep

(Newser) - Nightmares after a traumatizing experience might not have anything to do with stress. That's just one surprising finding to come out of what New Scientist calls "one of the largest ever studies of nightmares in the general population." To better understand why some people who've suffered... More »

Sorry, Millennials, You Don't Have Digital 'Special Powers'

Researchers say concept of a younger generation of 'digital natives' is a myth

(Newser) - Are you a "digital native" or a "digital immigrant," and does it make a difference? Research recently published in the Teaching and Teacher Education journal indicates the concept of so-called digital natives—aka, those slotted into the "millennials" category and younger, and often thought to be... More »

Canaanites Weren't Annihilated by Ancient Israelites After All

Researchers say they lived on to become the ancestors of today's Lebanese

(Newser) - The Bible suggests the Canaanites were wiped out by the ancient Israelites, but a new study says otherwise, claiming the people survived and went on to be the ancestors of those who today live in Lebanon, ScienceDaily reports. Per a study in the American Journal of Human Genetics , researchers from... More »

General Rule About Antibiotics Might Be Wrong

Finishing courses of antibiotics may boost resistance risk: experts

(Newser) - You've heard the spiel: Always finish your course of antibiotics, even if you feel better sooner. The idea is that even though you may feel better, the harmful bacteria in your body needs to be completely wiped out to keep it from developing antibiotic resistance. But that might be... More »

Researchers Finger Supplement That's Especially Risky for Kids

Scientists are issuing a warning about yohimbe

(Newser) - A Journal of Medical Toxicology study of calls made to poison control centers over the past 12 years finds one herbal supplement to be particularly concerning. Of those calls, the ones with the biggest proportion of serious medical outcomes had to do with yohimbe tree bark extract, NBC News reports.... More »

Reveal About Usain Bolt's Stride Upends Sprinting Science

Jamaican runner has an uneven stride, perhaps due to scoliosis

(Newser) - You'd think a smooth, even gait would ensure the fastest running speeds for elite athletes—but researchers who studied the world's fastest man have found that, at least in his case, symmetry doesn't matter. Per the New York Times , scientists from Southern Methodist University in Dallas released... More »

Scientists Offer First Analysis of How Much Plastic We've Made

Researchers estimate 9B tons have been produced

(Newser) - A new study puts a number on the amount of plastic the planet has manufactured in the roughly 65 years we've been cranking it out: 9 billion tons. If you're struggling to visualize that weight, the BBC helps out: That's as heavy as 25,000 Empire State... More »

Kissing the 'Right' Way: Most of Us Don't Go Left

New research suggests this tendency might be innate

(Newser) - Dig if you will the picture: two people engaged in a kiss. Prince sang about "curious poses," but new research suggests that most of us may strike similar poses, leaning to the right instead of the left when kissing the lips of our partners. Researchers at the University... More »

How Your Speech Could Offer Hint of Mental Decline

Verbal issues could be a clue to deteriorating cognitive state

(Newser) - Your speech may, um, help reveal if you're uh ... developing thinking problems. More pauses, filler words, and other verbal changes may be an early sign of mental decline, which can lead to Alzheimer's disease, a study suggests. Per the AP , researchers had 400 people without cognitive problems and... More »

Link Between Breastfeeding, Lower Risk of This Disease

How long a woman nurses appears to impact her risk in developing multiple sclerosis

(Newser) - Women are most likely to develop multiple sclerosis during their childbearing years—after they hit puberty and before menopause. And recent studies show that oral contraceptive use and levels of sex hormones impact a woman's risk, while women who already have the chronic autoimmune disease are less likely to... More »

Gonorrhea Vaccine Possibly Found—by Accident

Meningitis vaccine offers gonorrhea protection: study

(Newser) - The World Health Organization commented Friday on gonorrhea's increasing resistance to antibiotics, noting the STD now afflicts 78 million people each year, including patients whose cases "are untreatable by all known antibiotics." It's good timing, then, for what appears to be the first ever vaccine to... More »

Stories 1 - 20 |  Next >>

AROUND THE WEB