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Ride a Roller Coaster, Pass Some Kidney Stones

Though so far just one ride at Disney World seems to do the trick

(Newser) - Got a kidney stone? Consider a trip to Disney. That's the takeaway from new research out of Michigan State University that found taking a spin on a "medium-intensity" coaster may aid in the passing of the pesky mineral masses, with minimal discomfort, the Los Angeles Times reports. The... More »

Older Women Who've Never Wed Are Pretty Darn Happy

Just as happy as their married counterparts, in fact

(Newser) - While there are a bunch of studies showing that married folks seem to be happier than those who've stuck to singledom, a new study out of Bowling Green State University has found an apparent exception: older women who've never said "I do," per Live Science . The... More »

Your CEO Could Be an Actual Psychopath

An Aussie study finds 1 in 5 are, at least in one industry

(Newser) - What do prisoners and CEOs have in common? The answer isn't the punchline to a joke, but the finding of an Australian study out of Bond University that says about 20% of chief executives are psychopaths, the Telegraph reports. The results—presented Tuesday at the Australian Psychological Society Congress... More »

Want a Baby? Take a Chill Pill

Scientists say women with more stress may find it harder to conceive

(Newser) - Women trying to start a family who find themselves constantly reaching for a stress ball, take heed: All that extra anxiety may be keeping you from conceiving, AFP reports. A study carried out by researchers from the University of Louisville and published in the Annals of Epidemiology journal says that... More »

10% of World's Wilderness Wiped Out in 20 Years

And it could all be gone within a century if we don't turn things around, scientists say

(Newser) - Call it "where the wild things aren't." The Amazon and Central Africa have lost an immense amount of wilderness over the past 20 years or so, but scientists say those regions aren't the only ones in trouble: Nearly 10% of the world's wildlands have succumbed... More »

Scientists Flick Switch, Boozy Rats Stop Drinking

Study suggests alcoholism can be conquered in the brain

(Newser) - Rats can hit the bottle too hard, just like humans—and a new study suggests the rodents' alcohol dependence may be reversible, Live Science reports. "We can completely reverse alcohol dependence by targeting a network of neurons," says lead scientist Olivier George in a statement on the study,... More »

You Don't Know as Many Words as You Think You Do

Maybe about 42K if you're a 20-year-old, slightly more if you're older—but definitely not 200K

(Newser) - You don't have to be a lexicographer to have a pretty ample lexicon—but your word knowledge still may not be as ample as you think. At least, that's according to a Ghent University study published in the Frontiers in Psychology , said to be the largest ever of... More »

Lazy Contact Care Can Mess Up Eyes Long Term

Nearly 20% of eye infections from contacts result in more serious eye injuries: CDC

(Newser) - Sleeping with contacts in or forgetting to swap in a new pair according to schedule may be the unintended result of a harried lifestyle, but it could also lead to long-term eye damage, a new CDC study reports. Researchers looked at 1,075 cases of eye infections reported to an... More »

Here's How an Ancient Iceman Kept Warm

Clothing made from bear, sheep, goat, deer, cattle—you name it, Oetzi wore it

(Newser) - Scientists say Oetzi the Iceman , whose mummified body has been studied extensively since it was discovered on a glacier near the Italian-Austrian border in 1991, wore clothes made of brown bear pelt and roe deer when he died in the Alps 5,300 years ago. Researchers in Italy used genetic... More »

That Techno Beat May Be Hiding a Secret Message

Cybersecurity researcher pulls it off via Ibiza dance music

(Newser) - There is a long and melodious history of hiding secret messages in song—so-called musical steganography—that dates back at least 500 years. But now a cybersecurity expert from Poland has revealed a new way to send messages that are otherwise undetectable through song: tiny adjustments in tempo. To test... More »

Here's Why Amish Kids Don't Get Asthma as Often

They can probably thank the cows

(Newser) - You're probably less likely to see an Amish kid carrying around an inhaler, because they don't seem to get asthma as often as other kids—and researchers think it's due to the cows, Live Science reports. In a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine ... More »

Traveling in Deep Space Is Bad for Your Heart

Apollo astronauts are much more likely to die of cardiovascular disease

(Newser) - Planning a trip to the moon? You might want to think about heart health first. According to a study published in Scientific Reports , travel in deep space dramatically raises the risk of cardiovascular disease. Florida State University researchers looked at America's Apollo astronauts, who are the only people ever... More »

Even Some Activity Keeps Death at Bay for Couch Potatoes

And one hour wipes out death risk from 8 hours of sitting, scientists say

(Newser) - If you think squeezing an hour of exercise in per day can't come close to making up for the other 23 hours when you're relatively sedentary—and so you don't bother at all—rethink that strategy. A study by Cambridge University and the Norwegian School of Sports... More »

Cocaine, Meth Can Mess With Your Morals

Stimulant use is particularly prevalent in criminal populations, researchers say

(Newser) - Which comes first, the hard drugs or the criminal behavior? Researchers asked essentially that in a study just published in the journal Psychopharmacology in which they investigate whether cocaine and meth use might hamper moral judgment on a neurological level. The short answer is probably, though further research is required.... More »

Flying East Is a Pain for Your Brain

Biological clock prefers a longer day achieved by flying west: study

(Newser) - A flight from Paris to New York is easier on the brain than one from New York to Paris, according to a new study that finds jet lag is based not only on distance traveled, but also the direction of travel. In the journal Chaos , researchers from the University of... More »

Study: Teens Who Never Would've Smoked Are Vaping

The smoking rate dropped in 2004; then came e-cigarettes

(Newser) - With the debut of vaping in the US in 2007, there was hope that teens who smoked would replace old-school cigarettes with e-cigarettes, curbing tobacco use. But a new USC study in the journal Pediatrics has found teens who never would have smoked regular cigarettes are experimenting with vaping. Another... More »

Italian Researchers: Pasta Doesn't Make You Fat

Pasta intake linked to lower obesity rates

(Newser) - People who blame pasta for weight gain have missed the message about the Mediterranean diet , according to Italian researchers. The team from IRCCS Neuromed Institute in Italy crunched the numbers from earlier studies involving more than 20,000 Italians and discovered that pasta intake was associated both with lower obesity... More »

Exactly 2 Premarital Sex Partners Ups Divorce Rate

For women, that is

(Newser) - A new study out of the University of Utah finds that women with either no sexual partners or one—most typically, her future spouse—before marriage are the least likely to get divorced within five years; women with 10 or more are the most. A closer look at the numbers,... More »

Strong Chemo Plus Stem Cell Transplant May Halt MS

Study used extremely small sample size, but results are encouraging

(Newser) - The sample size was quite small, but research on patients with multiple sclerosis shows promising results on stopping the progression of the incurable disease that causes the immune system to attack the coating around nerve fibers (and the fibers themselves) in the brain and spinal cord, the BBC reports. Per... More »

Most Antidepressants for Kids, Teens Don't Work

And some may even be dangerous—though unreliable data is mucking things up

(Newser) - A new study suggests that giving most antidepressants to kids and teens with depression is useless—and may even be harmful. Scientists took a look at 34 trials involving 14 antidepressants and 5,260 subjects with an average age of 9 to 18, a release notes. Drugs studied included sertraline,... More »

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