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Why Today's Teens Don't Act Their Age

'Helicopter parenting' is one factor, researchers say

(Newser) - Compared to a generation ago, today's young people are dawdling when it comes to experiencing behaviors traditionally seen as precursors to adulthood: drinking, driving, having sex, and joining the workforce. As a result, they're often called "lazy"—but that's not exactly accurate. According to researchers,... More »

Clean Needles Aren't the Only Tattoo Concern

Ask about the chemicals in the ink—your lymph nodes could be tainted from them

(Newser) - Besides getting stuck with a Hello Kitty tattoo for life, there's another downside to getting skin ink: Microscopic particles can taint your lymph nodes. A new study found that after a person gets a tat, nano traces of the ink containing preservatives and contaminants work their way into the... More »

There's Not Much Evidence That Drinking While Pregnant Is Bad

But you shouldn't do it anyway, researchers say

(Newser) - Researchers say up to 80% of pregnant women in the UK, Ireland, Australia, and New Zealand have had an alcoholic beverage during their pregnancies—some due to the fact that they didn't realize they were pregnant when they threw one back, the Guardian notes. But getting that "positive"... More »

'ET' Dust Extracted From White Cliffs of Dover

Cosmic particles could offer clues to past major events like asteroid collisions

(Newser) - The White Cliffs of Dover serve as both a stunning photographic subject and as an iconic British symbol of defense during war. Now they're also a geological museum of sorts: Scientists from Imperial College London have discovered 76 particles of fossilized cosmic dust in the chalky limestone, which could... More »

'Drastic' Ketogenic Diet Helps Mice Live Longer

Scientists are looking for molecular triggers

(Newser) - All fat, easy on the carbs? At least for one particular breed of lab mice, the so-called ketogenic diet could improve various health metrics, including strength and lifespan. Per a news release , researchers report that two independent studies support the same theme: that a diet with very low to zero... More »

Avoid This Mistake When Shopping Online

Customers are swayed by number of reviews, even for bad products

(Newser) - Quantity matters, at least when it comes to product reviews. New research finds that consumers are swayed by the number of reviews an item receives, even if it's of worse quality. Quartz reports that the study analyzing buying habits on Amazon shows that online products with the most reviews... More »

Skeleton Found in Underwater Cave One of Oldest in Americas

Too bad thieves stole it

(Newser) - Back in 2012, divers in Mexico discovered a human skeleton submerged in a cave on the Yucatan Peninsula and posted photos to social media, drawing the attention of scientists. "I immediately knew that we had something special," paleontologist Wolfgang Stinnesbeck tells Inverse . But by the time researchers arrived... More »

Yet Another Reason Not to Snack at Night

When we eat impacts certain skin genes

(Newser) - Eating when we should be sleeping could disrupt our skin's ability to protect itself from the sun's harmful rays, researchers now say. Specifically, per a ScienceDaily news release, noshing down late at night can mess with the skin's biological clock, which in turn can affect the effectiveness... More »

Eat More Fat, Fewer Carbs

Research shows low-fat diets don't keep us alive longer

(Newser) - Fat, it turns out, is good for you. Or at least it's not as bad as we previously thought, per a sweeping new study that suggests low-fat diets could increase the risk of early death, the Telegraph reports. The surprising findings published in the Lancet suggest that instead of... More »

Engineer Says She's Solved Mystery of Civil War Sub

Her conclusion: torpedo shock waves killed the crew, doomed the Hunley

(Newser) - For more than 150 years, researchers have scratched their heads over a Civil War mystery—and now a Navy engineer says she's solved it. Rachel Lance has been diving deep into the 1864 sinking of the Confederate submarine HL Hunley, which mysteriously went down shortly after sinking the Union'... More »

Moms Still Put Babies to Sleep in Unsafe Positions

Less than half of mothers always put babies to sleep on their backs

(Newser) - In 1994, the "Back to Sleep" campaign launched, urging American parents to put their babies to sleep on their backs to reduce the risk of sudden infant death syndrome, CBS News reports. According to News Medical , rates of infants sleeping on their back increased from 10% to 78% over... More »

Scientists Spot Stage 1 Cancers Via Blood Test

Earlier treatment could save millions of lives

(Newser) - Human blood is rich with genetic material, and scientists have in recent years taken many steps forward in decoding it. The latest announcement—that a blood test can spot cancer at its earliest stages—has the potential to save millions of lives as treatment is administered earlier in the disease'... More »

Breakthrough in Search for Peanut Allergy Cure

New study found 80% of subjects could still tolerate peanuts 4 years later

(Newser) - Could a cure for peanut allergies be close? Australia's ABC reports that in a new study , 82% of participants saw their peanut allergies cured within the first 18 months of treatment. Four years later, 80% of the participants still showed no signs of an allergy, and 70% passed a... More »

'Frankenstein' Dinosaur Transforms Evolutionary Tree

Chilesaurus bridges two major dino groups, scientists say

(Newser) - Like the theropod dinosaur T. rex, Chilesaurus stood upright, with strong hind legs and shorter front limbs. But its flat teeth were more closely related to ornithischians like triceratops and stegosaurus. That's just one thing that irked scientists when Chilesaurus was named a theropod following its discovery in Chile... More »

Big Breakthrough Could Mean Pig Organs in Humans

Scientists who've created genetically modified piglets say perhaps in 2 years

(Newser) - Pig organs have long been eyed as transplant options for humans, as the organs are about the same size and pigs are plentiful, but it's been challenging to overcome the human immune system's possible rejection of such organs. Now, in what one medical expert tells the New York ... More »

A Virginia Driver Is Masquerading as a Car Seat

It's part of a Virginia Tech study of autonomous cars

(Newser) - It's still a couple of months until Halloween, but some in Arlington, Va., are already dressing up—as car seats. An NBC Washington reporter spotted a seemingly autonomous van driving around Arlington on Monday. On closer inspection, he realized there actually was a driver—the man was just disguised... More »

Almost Everyone Thinks Atheists Are the Worst

'Atheists are broadly perceived as potentially morally depraved and dangerous': study

(Newser) - When given a hypothetical scenario describing a fictional character who progresses from torturing animals as a child to murdering homeless people as an adult, most people assume that this person is an atheist—and that includes atheists themselves. That's what researchers at the University of Kentucky in Lexington are... More »

Women's Brains More Active Than Men's in 2 Key Areas

Those managing self-control and focus, as well as mood disorders

(Newser) - In the latest "men are from Mars, women are from Venus" debate, neuroscience jumps into the fray. In what UPI deems the "largest functional brain imaging survey ever," researchers from California's Amen Clinics used a type of 3D imaging to determine that women's brains are... More »

How Being Lonely Can Be as Bad for Your Health as Smoking

And social isolation and loneliness may carry even more mortality risk than obesity

(Newser) - Being lonely won't just make you feel sad—it may also endanger your life. In fact, researchers now say that people steeped in social isolation (including those who live by themselves) and a lack of connection with others can suffer just as much of a mortality risk as someone... More »

Mediterranean Diet Has a Downside

The rich, well-educated benefit the most, study says

(Newser) - Despite its many purported advantages , the Mediterranean diet might not be all it's cracked up to be. According to a new study in the International Journal of Epidemiology , its effects depend largely on socioeconomic status. Researchers surveyed 19,000 people ages 35 and over in Italy, giving each a... More »

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