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Researchers Finger Supplement That's Especially Risky for Kids

Scientists are issuing a warning about yohimbe

(Newser) - A Journal of Medical Toxicology study of calls made to poison control centers over the past 12 years finds one herbal supplement to be particularly concerning. Of those calls, the ones with the biggest proportion of serious medical outcomes had to do with yohimbe tree bark extract, NBC News reports.... More »

Reveal About Usain Bolt's Stride Upends Sprinting Science

Jamaican runner has an uneven stride, perhaps due to scoliosis

(Newser) - You'd think a smooth, even gait would ensure the fastest running speeds for elite athletes—but researchers who studied the world's fastest man have found that, at least in his case, symmetry doesn't matter. Per the New York Times , scientists from Southern Methodist University in Dallas released... More »

Scientists Offer First Analysis of How Much Plastic We've Made

Researchers estimate 9B tons have been produced

(Newser) - A new study puts a number on the amount of plastic the planet has manufactured in the roughly 65 years we've been cranking it out: 9 billion tons. If you're struggling to visualize that weight, the BBC helps out: That's as heavy as 25,000 Empire State... More »

Kissing the 'Right' Way: Most of Us Don't Go Left

New research suggests this tendency might be innate

(Newser) - Dig if you will the picture: two people engaged in a kiss. Prince sang about "curious poses," but new research suggests that most of us may strike similar poses, leaning to the right instead of the left when kissing the lips of our partners. Researchers at the University... More »

How Your Speech Could Offer Hint of Mental Decline

Verbal issues could be a clue to deteriorating cognitive state

(Newser) - Your speech may, um, help reveal if you're uh ... developing thinking problems. More pauses, filler words, and other verbal changes may be an early sign of mental decline, which can lead to Alzheimer's disease, a study suggests. Per the AP , researchers had 400 people without cognitive problems and... More »

Link Between Breastfeeding, Lower Risk of This Disease

How long a woman nurses appears to impact her risk in developing multiple sclerosis

(Newser) - Women are most likely to develop multiple sclerosis during their childbearing years—after they hit puberty and before menopause. And recent studies show that oral contraceptive use and levels of sex hormones impact a woman's risk, while women who already have the chronic autoimmune disease are less likely to... More »

Gonorrhea Vaccine Possibly Found—by Accident

Meningitis vaccine offers gonorrhea protection: study

(Newser) - The World Health Organization commented Friday on gonorrhea's increasing resistance to antibiotics, noting the STD now afflicts 78 million people each year, including patients whose cases "are untreatable by all known antibiotics." It's good timing, then, for what appears to be the first ever vaccine to... More »

Simple Trick May Help Plants Survive Drought

The effect was seen in rice, wheat, corn, and more

(Newser) - As the climate warms, scientists are conducting experiments around the world to try to boost drought resistance in a wide range of crops. But a study out of the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science in Japan is especially promising because the key ingredient helping a wide range of crops... More »

Humans Developed Arthritis as They Moved Out of Africa

Joint pain is the price we paid for evolution

(Newser) - Arthritis causes pain and suffering for millions of people around the world, but it's also the byproduct of an evolutionary mutation that allowed early humans to make the move from Africa to colder climates tens of thousands of years ago. Researchers at Stanford University have discovered that a genetic... More »

No, Young Kids Don't Need a Father

No difference in well-being of kids of single moms by choice, heterosexual couples: study

(Newser) - Ladies considering becoming single mothers may get a confidence boost from a new study out of the Netherlands, which has found no difference in the well-being of young children raised by women who chose to become pregnant without a partner and those from more traditional households. With fertility treatments for... More »

What Our Voice Says About Us

Changes in voice may reveal a lot about ourselves, study says

(Newser) - Job hunters, take note: If you're insecure during an interview, your voice may give you away. A new study reveals that people speak in higher-pitched voices when they're speaking to someone they see as higher status. Writing in Quartz , the researchers say that men and women who viewed... More »

Human Life May Have No Limit

New research counters claim human life has maxed out at 115

(Newser) - Good news for those making plans for their 110th birthday: The human lifespan is perhaps far more robust than previously thought. The Guardian reports that new research disputes a high-profile claim last year that the human lifespan has maxed out at 114.9 years. In an extraordinary scientific feud, five... More »

Depressed? Try Rock Climbing

New research shows that scaling a rock face may help ease depression

(Newser) - Heading out for a weekend climb or scaling the rock wall at the gym may be good therapy for treating depression, new research shows. A University of Arizona study found that a form of rock climbing eased depression symptoms in participants from moderate to mild levels after eight weeks, Inverse... More »

New Theory on When Babies Should Be in Own Room

Study suggests moving them out of parents' room at 6 months improves sleep

(Newser) - More fodder for the debate on when babies should be sleeping in their own rooms: A new study in Pediatrics suggests 6 months of age is a good target, which generally contradicts advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics. The AAP says babies should sleep in the same room as... More »

Medical Costs Spike for Bike Injuries

Men account for most of it

(Newser) - Taking a bike ride can offer various health benefits, but along with those pros come the cons: notably, the risk of being seriously hurt in an accident. UC San Francisco researchers say such incidences have risen steadily for adults since the late 1990s, with more visits to the ER and... More »

You Can Cut Hand-Washing Time in Half

10 seconds appears to do the trick: Rutgers study

(Newser) - You don't need to risk scalding yourself in order to get clean hands. According to researchers, washing your hands in cold water is just as effective at reducing bacteria as washing your hands in hot water. That's based on a small study of 21 people described in the... More »

More Studying, Less Playing Is Good for Preschoolers

Study finds 'academic-oriented' pre-kindergarten programs help kids

(Newser) - If you think preschool is all about playing with dolls and blocks, think again. There's a growing trend toward more rigorous, scholarly preschools—and a new study supports the idea, finding that children who attended a year at an "academic-oriented" preschool were performing better academically by the end... More »

Pity the Hot Scientists

Study finds we don't take them as seriously as their nerdy, frumpy counterparts

(Newser) - Hot scientists may not have careers that are so hot, according to, well, scientists who find that the laboratory is apparently the anti-Hollywood. The researchers, whose work was published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Scientists , asked roughly 3,700 participants to rate the headshots of 600... More »

Even One Drink a Day Can Up Breast Cancer Risk

Regular physical activity, on the other hand, may have the opposite effect

(Newser) - Just one alcoholic drink per day—even a teeny one—may not bode well for women on the breast cancer front, reports the Washington Post . That's the conclusion of a large-scale review by the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research fund that took a closer... More »

As Doctor's Age Climbs, So Does Patient Death Rate

Researchers say finding is 'clinically important'

(Newser) - Having a more experienced doctor might not be best. That's the message from a Harvard Medical School study published in the British Medical Journal that appears to show patient mortality rate increases with the age of a doctor. The increase is small but significant: In a study of more... More »

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