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Depressed? Try Rock Climbing

New research shows that scaling a rock face may help ease depression

(Newser) - Heading out for a weekend climb or scaling the rock wall at the gym may be good therapy for treating depression, new research shows. A University of Arizona study found that a form of rock climbing eased depression symptoms in participants from moderate to mild levels after eight weeks, Inverse... More »

New Theory on When Babies Should Be in Own Room

Study suggests moving them out of parents' room at 6 months improves sleep

(Newser) - More fodder for the debate on when babies should be sleeping in their own rooms: A new study in Pediatrics suggests 6 months of age is a good target, which generally contradicts advice from the American Academy of Pediatrics. The AAP says babies should sleep in the same room as... More »

Medical Costs Spike for Bike Injuries

Men account for most of it

(Newser) - Taking a bike ride can offer various health benefits, but along with those pros come the cons: notably, the risk of being seriously hurt in an accident. UC San Francisco researchers say such incidences have risen steadily for adults since the late 1990s, with more visits to the ER and... More »

You Can Cut Hand-Washing Time in Half

10 seconds appears to do the trick: Rutgers study

(Newser) - You don't need to risk scalding yourself in order to get clean hands. According to researchers, washing your hands in cold water is just as effective at reducing bacteria as washing your hands in hot water. That's based on a small study of 21 people described in the... More »

More Studying, Less Playing Is Good for Preschoolers

Study finds 'academic-oriented' pre-kindergarten programs help kids

(Newser) - If you think preschool is all about playing with dolls and blocks, think again. There's a growing trend toward more rigorous, scholarly preschools—and a new study supports the idea, finding that children who attended a year at an "academic-oriented" preschool were performing better academically by the end... More »

Pity the Hot Scientists

Study finds we don't take them as seriously as their nerdy, frumpy counterparts

(Newser) - Hot scientists may not have careers that are so hot, according to, well, scientists who find that the laboratory is apparently the anti-Hollywood. The researchers, whose work was published Tuesday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Scientists , asked roughly 3,700 participants to rate the headshots of 600... More »

Even One Drink a Day Can Up Breast Cancer Risk

Regular physical activity, on the other hand, may have the opposite effect

(Newser) - Just one alcoholic drink per day—even a teeny one—may not bode well for women on the breast cancer front, reports the Washington Post . That's the conclusion of a large-scale review by the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research fund that took a closer... More »

As Doctor's Age Climbs, So Does Patient Death Rate

Researchers say finding is 'clinically important'

(Newser) - Having a more experienced doctor might not be best. That's the message from a Harvard Medical School study published in the British Medical Journal that appears to show patient mortality rate increases with the age of a doctor. The increase is small but significant: In a study of more... More »

Not Sleeping Well? People May Avoid You

People are less inclined to socialize with someone who looks tired: study

(Newser) - Beauty sleep is no myth. A new study out of Stockholm University published in the Royal Society Open Science journal finds a lack of sleep makes a person look "significantly" less attractive, per the BBC . And that's not all. Swollen eyelids and dark circles around the eyes might... More »

This Is the Longest-Nursing of Any Primate

Orangutans set a record, researchers find

(Newser) - Orangutans nurse their young for up to eight years or longer, a new study finds—a record for primates. As National Geographic notes, it's difficult to study orangutans in the wild since they're so often out of sight in trees, but it's important for conservationists to know... More »

T. Rex Had a Bite So Powerful It's Hard to Fathom

Chompers came down with equivalent force of 3 small cars

(Newser) - Scientists already knew Tyrannosaurus rex had a ferocious bite, but a new study in Scientific Reports spells out in detail just how fearsome it was. In terms of raw numbers, they measured the bite force at nearly 8,000 pounds, with the tip of the teeth exerting pressure of around... More »

Sniff Myth, Busted: Humans Can Smell as Well as Dogs

Analysis of more than 1K olfactory studies challenges longtime belief

(Newser) - A dog's nose may be wetter than yours, but don't count yourself out when it comes to tracking a scent just as well as your canine companion. A new mega-study in the journal Science refutes the longtime belief that dogs' noses are vastly superior to our own, reporting... More »

It's Getting Harder to Find the 'Call of the Wild'

Those peaceful sounds we love in Mother Nature are getting drowned out by humans

(Newser) - The call of the wild is getting harder to hear. Peaceful natural sounds—bird songs, rushing rivers, rustling grass—are being drowned out by noise from people in many of America's protected parks and wilderness areas, a new study in the journal Science finds. Scientists measured sound levels in... More »

Mastodon Bones Spark Major Claim—and Major Doubt

Did humans live in California 130K years ago?

(Newser) - Exactly how long have humans been in the Americas? A wealth of evidence suggests they arrived as early as 20,000 years ago, while the earliest record of modern humans in the world dates back 200,000 years to Africa (and they probably didn't leave until around 50,000... More »

Scientists Figure Out Mystery of 'Bloody' Antarctic Waterfall

Blood Falls gets its liquid from large brine source underneath glacier: scientists

(Newser) - The only thing that has moved slower than Taylor Glacier is progress on solving a 100-year-old mystery about the famous red waterfall nearby—until now. Since 1911, when a scientist first stumbled across Antarctica's Blood Falls, researchers have been scratching their heads about a flow of salty water leading... More »

Drug Costs $3, Is OTC, and Could Save 30K Lives a Year

Tranexamic acid could save one-third of moms suffering from postpartum bleeding

(Newser) - Each year, more than 100,000 women around the world die from hemorrhaging after giving birth, mainly in underdeveloped nations. But the Guardian reports a cheap, safe drug that's been used for other conditions may be able to reduce that number, to the tune of 30,000 lives saved... More »

Got Acne? A Vaccine Could Be Coming

Still a long way to go, but initial results on a possible vaccine seem promising

(Newser) - Eric Huang says he's "good at vaccine development." The UC San Diego dermatology professor tells the university's Guardian he has even worked on a biodefense vaccine to fight anthrax , with a boost from the National Institutes of Health. Huang's latest development on the vaccine scene,... More »

Knowing Booze Causes Cancer Inspires People to Cut Down

Most effective ad at motivating people to reduce their drinking shows cancer mutations

(Newser) - If you want to get people to stop boozing it up, don't show them images of glasses of healthy, sparkling water instead of beer—show them an ad that illustrates how too many cocktails can cause cancer to course through their bodies, the Guardian reports. That's the finding... More »

One Illness May Meet Its Match in ... Frog Mucus

South Indian amphibian has molecule in secretions that may fend off some flu strains

(Newser) - Kissing a frog may not conjure a prince, but mucus from one colorful Indian variety could one day lead to new ways to fight off the flu, the Verge reports. A study published in the journal Immunity details how scientists tested secretions from an Indian frog known as Hydrophylax bahuvistara... More »

'Damn Near Everybody' Uses Phones While Driving

Zendrive shares concerning numbers in largest distracted-driving analysis yet

(Newser) - An eyebrow-raising new study assesses the extent of distracted driving, with stats revealing just how many people use their cellphones while behind the wheel. "Damn near everybody … damn near all the time," Wired concludes after reviewing the Zendrive report, which the driving analytics company says is the... More »

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