Bering Strait

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1st Arctic Dwellers Lived There for 4K Years

The Dorsets never mixed DNA with other peoples, study says

(Newser) - An ancient people lived in the Arctic a thousand years ago, leaving behind few clues to explain their heritage or sudden disappearance. Now a new DNA study sheds light on the so-called Dorset people, saying they migrated from Asia around 3000 BC and became the first settlers in the North... More »

1st Americans Took 'Break' for 10K Years

Settlers from Asia may have lived in Beringia, scientists say

(Newser) - Nothing like taking a break on a long trip—for, say, 10,000 years. That's how long the first human settlers stayed in Beringia—the region that once bridged Siberia and Alaska—before inhabiting North America about 15,000 years ago, according to a new scientific paper by University... More »

Russia OKs Underwater Tunnel to Alaska

But it would transport freight, not people, under Bering Strait

(Newser) - How do you get from the US to Asia without a boat or a plane? If Russia has its way, you may soon be able to take the train. Moscow has approved an underwater tunnel through the Bering Strait, linking Alaska and Russia via underground train, AOL Autos reports. The... More »

Melting Ice Opens Arctic to Trade, But US Lags

Climate change opens north to shipping, tourism, resource development

(Newser) - Climate change is melting away the main barrier to business in the Arctic—ice—but the US lags behind other countries seeking to exploit the region, the Anchorage Daily News reports. As receding ice opens the area to shipping, resource exploitation, and tourism, it's Russia and Canada who have established... More »

Fishing Banned in Melting Arctic

Federal panel moves to block trawlers from newly accessible waters

(Newser) - A federal panel has voted to block fishing trawlers from moving into a vast area of the Arctic Sea made newly accessible by melting ice, the New York Times reports. The move will protect 150,000 square nautical miles of US waters north of the Bering Strait while scientists assess... More »

9,300-Year-Old Bones Shouldn't Be Buried

Tribes' claims on skeleton inspire ire of National Review editors

(Newser) - The Senate Indian Affairs Committee has made a two-word correction to federal law that jeopardizes the study of pre-Columbian history, National Review's editors argue. The 9,300-year-old bones known as Kennewick Man—featured on a Time cover after they were unearthed in 1996—are the subject of a dispute between... More »

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