cancer screening

19 Stories

Guys With Long Legs Have Twice the Risk of 1 Cancer

More growth hormones that drive bone growth in legs may be risk factor for colon cancer

(Newser) - Higher cancer rates have been linked generally to taller people, but University of Minnesota researchers are reporting a startling find: Men with longer legs have a 42% higher risk of developing colorectal cancer than those with shorter legs, reports Live Science . More specifically, they found that the men with the... More »

Screenings Slash Colon Cancer Rate 30% in a Decade

But researchers see more work ahead

(Newser) - The fight against colon cancer through screening is "one of the great public health success stories of the decade," says a top figure at the American Cancer Society: In people over 50, colon cancer rates have dropped by 30% over the past decade, researchers say. That's mostly... More »

Study: Colonoscopy Cuts Cancer Deaths

Invasive test definitely a life-saver, researchers say

(Newser) - To say colonoscopies are unpopular would be an understatement, but the procedure definitely saves lives, a new study finds. The research, which confirms what doctors have long believed, found that the death rate from colon cancer was cut by 53% among people who had the test and had precancerous growths... More »

Medical Panel to Men: Skip Prostate Screening

Government group says PSA test doesn't save lives

(Newser) - A potentially big change in men's health care: A governmental health panel is about to recommend that men stop getting screened for prostate cancer, reports CNN . The Preventative Services Task Force has concluded that the commonly used PSA blood test often does more harm than good because it leads... More »

Screening Has Little Impact on Breast Cancer Deaths

Death rate down because of better treatment, researchers say

(Newser) - The drop in breast cancer deaths over the last few decades is thanks to better treatment, not widespread screening, according to a new study. European countries that introduced routine screening early saw breast cancer deaths decline at roughly the same rate as countries that introduced screening 10 to 15 years... More »

Screening Doesn't Reduce Ovarian Cancer Deaths

In fact, it can actually have negative impact

(Newser) - Bad news from a new cancer study: Not only does ovarian cancer screening not reduce the number of deaths from the disease—it also leads to unnecessary treatment for false positives. The 16-year study of 78,000 women found that doctors "were unable to detect ovarian cancers any earlier"... More »

Ovarian Cancer Breakthrough Raises Hopes

New use for old test: early diagnosis of deadly disease

(Newser) - Combining an existing blood test for ovarian cancer with a new screening protocol may lead to a reliable way to diagnose the deadly disease in its early stages, a new study says. "This is an important step forward," the lead researcher tells the Houston Chronicle . " This may... More »

Women Refuse to Cut Back on Mammograms: Poll

But most are misinformed about the risks

(Newser) - An overwhelming majority of American women intend to ignore the recommendation that they get fewer mammograms, with most wildly overestimating their risk of breast cancer. In a new poll, 84% of women aged 35 to 49 say they still intend to get routine mammograms before age 50, in keeping with... More »

Doctors Blast New Mammogram Guidelines

Cancer societies, gynecologists won't follow government's lead

(Newser) - There was an instant backlash from oncologists and gynecologists yesterday after a government panel recommended that that women in their 40s stop getting annual mammograms. “I think it is unfortunate that they came to this conclusion,” the director of imaging at one breast cancer center told the Los ... More »

Govt. Panel Recommends Fewer Mammograms

Breast cancer screenings should start at 50, not 40: task force

(Newser) - Most women can wait to get their first mammogram at 50 and then should get one every 2 years rather than annually, a powerful health policy group said today. New information led to the recommendations, said a member of the influential task force that reversed a 7-year-old edict urging aggressive... More »

Cancer Experts Worried About Screening

American Cancer Society to warn of risks as well as benefits

(Newser) - The American Cancer Society is rethinking its advice on screening for breast and prostate cancer amid studies showing that the tests can miss the deadliest forms of the disease, and in some cases lead to dangerous, unnecessary treatment. The society is working on a new message stressing that cancer screening... More »

Mammograms May Lead to Overtreatment: Study

But screening can't determine danger; many treated unnecessarily

(Newser) - One-third of breast cancers that show up on mammograms may be essentially harmless, meaning that treating every tumor causes unnecessary trauma, a five-nation study suggests. A mammogram doesn't reveal whether a cancer is lethal or harmless, so all get treated when some could be merely monitored, the BBC reports. The... More »

Study May Help Mastectomy Dilemma

Research identifies factors likely to imperil second breast

(Newser) - Researchers alarmed by a spike in potentially unnecessary double mastectomies have identified three risk factors that might help breast cancer patients make better decisions about whether to have a healthy breast removed, the Houston Chronicle reports. The research was motivated by an earlier study that revealed 80% of women who... More »

Black-White Cancer Death Gap Persists

Colorectal disease rate falls overall, but racial disparity grows

(Newser) - Even as instances of colorectal cancer in the US decrease, the gap between whites and blacks is growing, new research shows. Black men and women are 45% more likely to die from the disease than whites, HealthDay reports. While rates are lower for both white and black men, the difference... More »

Breast Cancer May Vanish Without Chemo

Fewer cancers found in women screened less often

(Newser) - Breast cancer goes into spontaneous remission far more often than had been believed, a new study has discovered. Researchers found that a fifth more cancers were found in women screened every two years than in a group screened once in six years, leading them to conclude that many cancers may... More »

Don't Be Fooled: Prostate Cancer Screening Is Key

Guidelines against PSA testing could cost lives

(Newser) - A national task force’s recent warning against prostate cancer screenings in some men could put their lives at risk, cautions physician and researcher William J. Catalona in the Washington Post. “It's important to note that consideration was not given to the overwhelming body of emerging evidence that screening... More »

New Cancer Scan Promising, But Much Testing Remains

Dramatic decrease in mortality rate is contested by scientists

(Newser) - A study claiming to dramatically reduce the risk of lung-cancer death is the object of intense scientific debate, Philip Boffey writes in the New York Times. Researchers screened asymptomatic smokers with spiral CT scans, which are more sensitive than the traditional chest X-ray. They estimate 92% of those found to... More »

Upbeat Cancer Research Funded by Big Tobacco

Cigarette bucks paid for controversial lung cancer study

(Newser) - Tobacco money paid for research that said CT scans could prevent 80% of lung cancer deaths, the New York Times reports. The news has shocked cancer researchers, who are generally loathe to have anything to do with cigarette companies. “If you’re using blood money, you need to tell... More »

DNA Test to Predict Cancer Risk

$300 test: a blessing or a curse?

(Newser) - A DNA test that can help predict a man's risk of developing prostate cancer is expected to be available later this year for as little as $300. It's the first glimpse of what's likely to be a revolution in medical testing to provide patients a window into their possible future.... More »

19 Stories