5 Stories

Scientists: We've Fixed Stevia's Bitter Aftertaste

They think it could make the sweetener much more popular

(Newser) - Researchers at Cornell say they've figured out a way to conquer one of the big drawbacks of the sugar substitute stevia—its bitter aftertaste. They zeroed in on the component in stevia that triggers two bitter receptors on the human tongue and were able to modify it through non-chemical... More »

Next From Coke: Fruit-less 'Fruitwater'

It's made with Splenda, not fruit juice

(Newser) - The brouhaha over our soda problems belies a shifting beverage landscape: Water has grabbed the No. 1 beverage slot from soda, with Americans drinking 58 gallons a year of the former and 44 of the latter, per Beverage Digest via the AP . No wonder, then, that Coca-Cola is hitching its... More »

Stevia Sets Sights on Sweetener Market

'Natural' substitute an advertiser's dream

(Newser) - The arrival of stevia, a new artificial sweetener approved by the FDA in December, will likely upend the fake-sugar market, the New York Times reports. Sweet ’N Low, Equal, and Splenda have fought to stalemate of sorts, but stevia brings a huge advantage: Because it comes from a plant,... More »

FDA OKs Natural, No-Calorie Sweetener

Coke, Pepsi will have stevia products soon

(Newser) - Get ready for a barrage of soft drinks and foods using the term stevia. The FDA today gave its blessing to use of the zero-calorie natural sweetener derived from the leaves of a South American bush, the Chicago Tribune reports. Coke and Pepsi will have drinks on the shelves soon,... More »

Coke, Cargill Team Up on New Sweetener

Based on herb called stevia, not yet approved in US

(Newser) - Coke has teamed up with Cargill to produce and market the all-natural, calorie-free sweetener rebiana, based on a South American herb called stevia. Coke and Cargill plan to market it in 12 countries that have approved stevia as a food additive, while attempting to win regulatory approval in the US... More »

5 Stories