medical study

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Surprise Diagnosis for Honeymooner's Itchy Groin

Fla. woman carried human botfly larva in skin from Belize

(Newser) - A tiny creature grew inside a Florida woman for two months after her honeymoon in Belize—and no, she wasn't pregnant. Weeks after returning home, the 36-year-old noticed an itchy spot on the left side of her groin and assumed she'd been bitten by an insect, reports Live... More »

Michael Jackson's Magical Tilt Isn't So Magical

Special shoes and a really strong core are needed, say neurosurgeons

(Newser) - Medical researchers apparently unaware that one should never reveal a magician's trick have pulled back the veil on a seemingly impossible dance move by Michael Jackson. The singer's gravity-defying 45-degree tilt, in which he leaned forward while keeping his body straight and shoes flat on the floor, first... More »

The Bacteria Eats Through Skin, Is Causing Mystery in Australia

Study quantifies the spread of Buruli ulcers in Victoria

(Newser) - "It is difficult to prevent a disease when it is not known how infection is acquired," reads a study published Monday that tracks the spread of a flesh-eating ulcer in Australia, and that's not the only mystery surrounding the rise in Buruli ulcers. The disease has historically... More »

They Were Treated for a Parasite. Then Their Butts Were Everywhere

'BMJ' withdraws journal article after embarrassed patients complain about the exposure

(Newser) - After suffering painful red rashes on their backsides, a husband and wife were left red in the face—so much so that a case study of their ordeal has now been pulled from the prestigious British Medical Journal. As BMJ tells the Washington Post , the British pair whose bottoms became... More »

In 1st Documented Case, Trans Woman Breastfeeds

It's 'a very big deal,' says one doctor

(Newser) - Though online forums suggest she's not the first to manage the feat, doctors are celebrating the case of a breastfeeding transgender woman, the first to be recorded in medical literature. The 30-year-old went to doctors at New York's Mount Sinai hospital with the intention of breastfeeding when her... More »

Bogus Glasses Damage Eyes of Eclipse Viewer

Woman borrowed a pair for a peek in Staten Island in August

(Newser) - Experts feared it would happen and, to one woman at least, it did. In JAMA Ophthalmology , doctors describe the case of New York's Nia Payne, who looked at August's total solar eclipse through unregulated eclipse glasses and ended up in the emergency room with a crescent-shaped spot obscuring... More »

The Pill, IUDs Raise Risk of Breast Cancer

Especially after prolonged use, say Danish researchers

(Newser) - For years, birth control pills have been linked to an increased risk of breast cancer, though newer drugs containing smaller doses of estrogen and progestin were assumed to be safer. A new study suggests they aren't. Researchers in Denmark reviewed public health records for 1.8 million women, using... More »

Study Finds Commonality in 61% of Opioid Deaths

Columbia University Medical Center researchers analyzed deaths between 2001 and 2007

(Newser) - As the staggering toll—in terms of bodies, emotions , money , and our life expectancy —of the opioid epidemic comes into sharper focus, the idea of those who are most at risk is crystallizing, too, thanks to research out of Columbia University Medical Center. What a press release calls the... More »

No More Amnios for Down Syndrome? Scientists Hope So

They say new test results in a 100-fold reduction in false positives

(Newser) - Doctors have discovered a more accurate way to prenatally test for chromosome disorders like Down syndrome, and it's less stressful for the mother to boot. Normally, if an ultrasound and blood test show a woman's risk of an affected pregnancy is high, doctors can perform additional tests to... More »

There's a Reason Afternoon Heart Surgery Is Best

Heart genes aren't in top form in the morning: scientists

(Newser) - Should you ever need heart surgery, it might be worth pressing for an afternoon appointment. New research in the Lancet finds patients who undergo morning heart surgery are twice as likely to suffer heart issues and other complications as patients who have surgery in the afternoon, per the BBC . It'... More »

No Proven Benefits, Several Risks to Eating Placenta

Placenta capsules may carry bacteria, heavy metals: study

(Newser) - The trend of eating placenta after childbirth "borders on cannibalism" and is only lining providers' pockets, rather than offering any benefit to women or their newborns. That's according to researchers of a study published in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, which finds "no known scientifically... More »

Doctors Find Way to Halt Deadly Child Brain Disease

Gene therapy is 'curative' for ALD, says doctor

(Newser) - Without a risky bone-marrow transplant before symptoms appear, children with brain disease ALD can expect to live no longer than five years as nerve cells in the brain die off and erase one's ability to walk, talk, and think. Even a successful transplant can result in permanent disabilities, reports... More »

Moms Can Lower Kid's Peanut Allergy Risk From First Meal

2-step process involves mom eating peanuts while breastfeeding

(Newser) - New moms can lower their child's risk of developing a peanut allergy in the kids' very first meals, according to Canadian researchers. A study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology suggests that children breastfed by peanut-eating moms are less likely to develop a nut allergy later, reports... More »

Breakthrough Could Transform Vaccine Shots

New technology would allow for a single childhood shot

(Newser) - Potential good news for kids—and the parents who hate to watch them squirm when faced with a needle. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have developed a technology that could allow childhood vaccines—for everything from polio to measles, mumps, and rubella—to be combined into a single... More »

'Exciting' Find Could Mean Fewer Heart Transplants

Protein 'tricks' heart into healthier behavior

(Newser) - Scientists in Canada say they've found a way to trick the heart, making it behave as if it were the beneficiary of exercise even if no exercise was able to be done. According to a study in Cell Research , the Ottawa researchers discovered that protein cardiotrophin 1 (CT1) can... More »

Cause of Woman's Stomach Pain Leaves Doctors 'Dumbfounded'

Dental wire pierced woman's intestine after years lodged in body

(Newser) - If you've worn braces, you know it's a pain when orthopedic wires poke into your gums. As an Australian woman can attest, it's no fun when they pierce the small intestine, either. Doctors initially cited a gallbladder issue when the 30-year-old arrived at a hospital in Western... More »

As Doctor's Age Climbs, So Does Patient Death Rate

Researchers say finding is 'clinically important'

(Newser) - Having a more experienced doctor might not be best. That's the message from a Harvard Medical School study published in the British Medical Journal that appears to show patient mortality rate increases with the age of a doctor. The increase is small but significant: In a study of more... More »

HIV Doesn't Shorten Lifespans the Way It Used To

Researchers credit new antiretroviral drugs

(Newser) - The average American born in 2015 is expected to live to 78.8 years of age . HIV patients aren't far behind. A Lancet study finds a 20-year-old who begins treatment for HIV today can live to an estimated 78 years due in part to advances in antiretroviral therapy, reports... More »

Deadly Brain Illness Blamed on Fruit

Toxin in lychee led to brain inflammation in kids: study

(Newser) - The Muzaffarpur area produces 70% of India's lychee fruit. It's also the site of a mysterious and deadly illness plaguing children in May and June for each of the last 22 years. Researchers now say the two facts go hand in hand. In a Lancet study, they say... More »

Boys' and Girls' Brains React Totally Differently to Trauma

Biologically opposite, in fact

(Newser) - A new study into male and female reactions to childhood trauma has revealed an interesting difference between the sexes, Live Science reports. The anterior circular sulcus—a region of the brain associated with emotional awareness and empathy—was larger in boys who had experienced trauma versus a control group who... More »

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