archaeologist

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Find Made at Jamestown May Be a Significant One

Archaeologists suspect they may have found George Yeardley's remains

(Newser) - "Who got such a prominent burial in the church?" It's the question archaeologists believe they know the answer to, though only time—and DNA analysis—will tell. Scientists working in Jamestown, Va., have unearthed remains they suspect might belong to Sir George Yeardley, the first governor of Virginia,... More »

At an Egyptian Site Last Excavated in 1900, a Significant Find

Archaeologists hope to learn more about mummification process used 2.5K years ago

(Newser) - "It's only the beginning," is how Egypt's antiquities minister on Saturday described a find made at a site near the country's famed pyramids at an ancient necropolis south of Cairo. The discovery—which includes a mummification workshop and a shaft, used as a communal burial... More »

Archaeologist Who Made Incredible Discovery Is Dead

China's Zhao Kangmin was first to identify ancient terra cotta army underground

(Newser) - It was Chinese farmers digging a well in 1974 who made the first strange discovery, but it was archaeologist Zhao Kangmin who realized the import. The farmers had stumbled onto an incredible "army" of about 8,000 life-size terra cotta warriors who had been guarding the tomb of China'... More »

FBI Solves the Mystery of an Ancient Severed Head

In an Egyptian tomb belonging to Djehutynakht and his wife, there was just one head

(Newser) - It has to rank among the less usual undertakings doctors at Massachusetts General Hospital had attempted: In 2009 they removed a molar from a severed Egyptian mummy's head via an endoscope with grasping forceps they inserted through the neck. The tooth was a hopeful clue in a nearly... More »

Bones of Fearsome Pirate May Have Been Found

Remains pulled from the wreckage of the Whydah Gally will be tested

(Newser) - When the Whydah Gally went down in a 1717 storm 144 lives were lost —none so noteworthy as that of Samuel "Black Sam" Bellamy. The New England Historical Society describes the pirate as infamous, but not infamously cruel: As historian Colin Woodard puts it, he followed a credo... More »

Archaeologist: I Found Trojan War-Era Throne

Greek culture ministry officials skeptical about the find

(Newser) - A Greek archaeologist believes he has found a fragment of the lost throne of the rulers of Mycenae, famous from ancient myth and the story of the Trojan War, the AP reports. Christofilis Maggidis, who heads excavations at the site in southern Greece, says the chunk of worked limestone was... More »

Is This the Face of a 16th-Century Pirate?

Remains were found under a school playground in Scotland

(Newser) - Students at a primary school in Scotland are set to get a real-life forensics lesson thanks to a centuries-old skeleton—believed to be that of a pirate—found last year beneath their playground, the Telegraph reports. Workers unearthed the remains while doing survey work for a planned extension at Victoria... More »

Archaeologists Find Pieces of SF Before the Quake

Sewing machine parts are the newest find

(Newser) - Subway construction workers in San Francisco are becoming accustomed to working alongside archaeologists as they dig up layers of the city's past to make way for the $1.6 billion light rail line set to connect Chinatown with South of Market by 2019. And now those teams have unearthed... More »

Archaeologist Heads to Egypt to Find Nefertiti's Tomb

Brit Nicholas Reeves thinks she was buried next to son Tutankhamun

(Newser) - British archaeologist Nicholas Reeves, who made news last month with his announcement that the long-lost tomb of Nefertiti is likely hidden behind secret doors in her son Tutankhamun's tomb, is headed to Egypt to put his theory to the test, reports PhysOrg . Nefertiti, the famously beautiful and powerful wife... More »

Has Queen Nefertiti's Lost Tomb Been Found?

'This is potentially the biggest archaeological discovery ever made'

(Newser) - Tutankhamun's tomb was discovered in 1922. Now, nearly a century later, a University of Arizona archaeologist says that tomb may hold a long-buried secret: the remains of Nefertiti . Nicholas Reeves says he stumbled upon the possibility while analyzing scans posted online in early 2014 by Spanish art-replication experts. The... More »

Mummified Remains Found in Indiana

The head and torso could be 2K years old

(Newser) - Workers exploring the site of an intended quarry in rural Indiana stumbled upon a mummified body that experts say could be anywhere from 500 to 2,000 years old, the Times of Northwest Indiana reports. "They could distinguish a head and a torso," says a local sheriff. "... More »

Near Irish 'Little Pompeii,' an Even More Ancient Site

Traces of buildings have been found along cliffs near a well-known castle

(Newser) - The settlement of Dunlace on Northern Ireland's craggy North Coast is thought to have been founded in 1608, but was eventually abandoned after a fire destroyed much of it in 1642. The settlement, first unearthed in 2009, reports the Belfast Telegraph , has been called Little Pompeii, and it's... More »

Archaeologists' '1M Mummies' Claim Was Way Off: Egypt

Officials revoke researchers' digging licenses

(Newser) - When researchers claimed to have found a million burials at a dig site in Egypt, the supposed news was widely reported—including on this site . But officials in the country say the claim is false, and they've revoked the scientists' dig licenses in connection with it, io9 reports. Archaeologist... More »

Newly Found Roman God Stumps Experts

Archaeologists say he could be a Roman-Near Eastern hybrid

(Newser) - Archaeologists have unearthed an ancient sculpture of a bearded man standing in a plant—and while they say it's most definitely a god, they have no idea which one. Found at the site of a Roman temple in Turkey, the roughly 2,000-year-old relief "clearly" depicts a deity,... More »

Archaeologists Search for Slain Playwright's Remains

But search for Federico Garcia Lorca's body won't involve digging

(Newser) - A Spanish official describes finding the remains of playwright Federico Garcia Lorca "like finding a needle in a haystack"—and the search for that needle has begun. Archaeologists yesterday kicked off a 10-day inspection of a 3,200-square-foot plot of land where they believe Garcia Lorca may have... More »

New Evidence: Alexander the Great's Dad in Greek Tomb

Remains belong to Macedonian King Philip II, archaeologist says

(Newser) - Remains found in an ancient tomb at Vergina nearly 40 years ago belong to none other than Alexander the Great's father, Greek researchers say. Their evidence: The bones and cremated remains show signs of violence that jibe with the life of Macedonian King Philip II, a warrior who lost... More »

Rome's Colosseum Was Once a 'Condo'

Amphitheater functioned as a 'condo' for centuries

(Newser) - If only these walls could talk. Rome's iconic Colosseum, built nearly 20 centuries ago in 72 AD, has long been known as the site of gory gladiator battles and animal slaughter. Now, archaeologists who spent three weeks studying an excavated area beneath some 80 arched entrances that opened up... More »

Vandals Carve Initials in 1K-Year-Old Rock Art

Bureau of Land Management is on the case

(Newser) - It's called one of Utah's most prominent pieces of rock art. But as visitors made their way past the "Pregnant Buffalo" petroglyphs in Nine Mile Canyon on Memorial Day weekend, vandals decided to make their mark by carving initials and the date into the prehistoric piece, the... More »

World's Oldest Calendar Discovered in Scotland

Predates previous 'oldest' by 5K years

(Newser) - The oldest calendar known to exist was created some 5,000 years ago in Mesopotamia—but it's looking positively youthful in the face of a new find in northern Scotland. A dig at Warren Field in Aberdeenshire in 2004 is just now giving up its secrets, with archaeologists revealing... More »

Archaeologists Stumped by Sea of Galilee Mystery

Next step: raise money to fund excavation

(Newser) - What Israeli archaeologists know: A bigger-than-Stonehenge structure submerged in the Sea of Galilee is man-made, made of stones that originated nearby, and weighs about 60,000 tons. What they don't know: Pretty much everything else. The AP revisits the mystery of the cone-shaped structure, which was revealed in an... More »

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