protein

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In the Future, Your DNA May Not ID You— Your Hair Might

Scientists say analyzing hair proteins may be better for identification than DNA testing

(Newser) - DNA testing has been the forensic scientist's workhorse for identification purposes, but it comes with major issues, reports the Los Angeles Times , and scientists now say they've got a possible substitute: hair proteins. Per a study published in PLoS One , these proteins are like replicas of a person'... More »

Hershey's Will Start Selling Meat Bars

Yes, you read that right

(Newser) - It's what every young child desperately saves his or her allowance for: the chance to go to the supermarket and buy a delicious Hershey's ... blueberry barbecue beef bar. Yes, that's a meat bar, though "we aren't going out there saying it is a meat bar,... More »

Scientists Test Best Cheese for Grilled Cheese Sandwich

It's all about how casein proteins clump together when cheese melts

(Newser) - Looking for the perfect cheese for the ultimately gooey, perfectly melted grilled cheese sandwich? Good news: Scientists with the American Chemical Society have put out a three-minute video from the society's "Reactions" series on YouTube all about that very subject. And the winners are ... gouda, gruyére, or... More »

Study: Here's Why Cheese Is Addictive, Salmon Isn't

Researchers say it all boils down to processing, fat, and glycemic load

(Newser) - Pizza is the most problematic food out there, as far as addictive-like qualities go. So report students who completed the Yale Food Addiction Scale as part of a study by researchers at the University of Michigan. Those researchers published their findings in PLoS ONE earlier this year, and wrote that... More »

Darwin's 'Strange Animals' Puzzle Solved

Protein-sequencing method could lead to other discoveries

(Newser) - A humpless, snouted camel? Check. A rhino with the teeth of a rodent and head of a hippo? No problem, scientists say, after apparently figuring out, finally, where these mystery creatures sit on the mammalian family tree, Nature reports. Charles Darwin discovered fossils of these ancient creatures while visiting South... More »

America Has a New Favorite Nut

That's an actual nut, not the politician who disagrees most with you

(Newser) - For decades, the peanut has reigned supreme, its popularity a league above the rest of the nuts (even though technically it's not a nut , but a legume). And while almonds have been growing in popularity faster than any other nut, it wasn't until recently that they finally surged... More »

America, Get Ready for 'A2 Milk'

Proponents say it's healthier than current variety, which is rich in A1 protein

(Newser) - Those sickened by US milk may not be lactose intolerant—in fact, if they were to head abroad, one in four might find the stuff easier to drink. That's because of a protein known as A1 that's typically predominant in the milk of Holstein cows, which are widespread... More »

High-Protein Diet 'Risky as Smoking' for Middle-Aged

But effects were reversed among over-65s

(Newser) - Good news and bad news for meat lovers: People who eat a diet high in protein in middle age are a staggering four times more likely to die of cancer than people on a low-protein diet, according to new research, but people over 65 who consumed more protein were less... More »

Breast Milk Protein May Ward Off HIV

That's why babies breastfed by infected moms usually don't catch it

(Newser) - Scientists think they've found a promising new avenue for an HIV treatment in an unlikely place: the breasts of moms. Public health officials have long noticed that infants breastfed by HIV-positive moms rarely contract the virus themselves—even though the virus is definitely inside the milk. Now, Duke scientists... More »

'Senior Moments' Don't Mean Alzheimer's

Study suggests gene link to normal memory loss

(Newser) - Finding yourself a little more forgetful these days? Don't panic—it comes with normal aging, and doesn't necessarily point to Alzheimer's. Scientists investigated the difference between the two processes in the hippocampus, the part of the brain associated with memory. While Alzheimer's is known to be... More »

If Sweat Doesn't Smell, Why Are We Stinky?

Turns out Bacteria is to blame for our smelly parts

(Newser) - Stuck in this week's brutal heat wave? You may be surprised to learn that sweat doesn't actually smell—and NPR has posted a video from the chemistry podcast Distillations to explain why. Turns out that there are two types of sweat glands, eccrine and apocrine; the former covers... More »

Vegans Turn to Bodybuilding

Animal-free dieters find ways to bulk up competitively

(Newser) - A new trend is sprouting in the sport of bodybuilding: veganism. A burgeoning group of competitive weight-lifters are turning to an all animal-free diet, reports the New York Times . It's a challenge because the vegan diet can be dauntingly limited for bodybuilders, who need a sufficient amount of amino... More »

Protein Made From Rice Can Cure Disease

HSA can also treat burns and traumatic shock

(Newser) - Scientists in China say they've extracted a protein from rice that can treat liver disease, burns, and traumatic shock. The breakthrough could lead to increased production of the protein, called HSA, which is "physically and chemically equivalent" to the HSA found in human blood and has been in... More »

New Test Predicts Alzheimer’s

Three markers in spinal fluid may help in development of treatment

(Newser) - The presence of certain biomarkers in spinal fluid can predict the development of Alzheimer's disease, even in patients who display no symptoms, according to breakthrough research being published tomorrow. "This is what everyone is looking for, the bull’s eye of perfect predictive accuracy," a doctor not connected... More »

8 'Health' Foods That Aren't So Healthy

Vitamin Water packs a lot more than just vitamins

(Newser) - Sure, an apple is a nutrient-filled snack, but so is a chocolate-chip peanut butter energy bar, right? Cracked blows the whistle on eight tasty "health" foods that actually aren't so good for our heath:
  1. Vitamin Water: As if the fact that it's owned by Coca-Cola isn't enough of a
... More »

Eating Right: Some Unusual Suspects

Celery, seaweed could work wonders for your diet

(Newser) - The usual admonitions we hear at this time of year about eating right are probably going in one ear and out the other, so perhaps these unusual health-food suspects from Men’s Health will catch your attention as you prepare that New Year’s resolution.
  • Celery: Its phytochemicals are thought
... More »

Infections Quicken Memory Loss in Alzheimer's Patients

Ailments boost inflammatory protein which may speed decline

(Newser) - Urinary tract, chest, and other infections may double the speed of memory loss among Alzheimer’s sufferers, researchers in Britain find. About half of subjects in a six-month study got infections outside the brain that prompted increased levels of an inflammatory protein; those who suffered such events, called SIEs, showed... More »

One Serving of Cotton, Please; Hold the Poison

Genetic engineering unlocks protein that could feed millions

(Newser) - Scientists have developed a novel genetic engineering technique that makes the protein-rich seeds of the cotton plant easily edible, Time reports. The entire plant, including the seeds, produces a toxic chemical called gossypol that protects it from insects and microbes. “People, pigs, chickens—none of us can stomach gossypol,... More »

'Rogue' Protein Spread Key to Alzheimer's

Discovery casts light on tangles found in brains of disease sufferers

(Newser) - A protein linked to Alzheimer’s can run amok in the brain, affecting healthy tissue, scientists have found. All nerve cells contain the tau protein, but a “rogue form” can lead to protein clumps in cells, called neurofibrillary tangles, that are believed to play a major role in Alzheimer’... More »

Peas Fight Kidney Disease, High Blood Pressure

Could be used as food additive or supplement

(Newser) - Concentrated doses of the proteins found in garden peas can help fight high blood pressure and chronic kidney disease, a study finds. “In people with high blood pressure, our protein could potentially delay or prevent the onset of kidney damage,” the study’s author tells the Telegraph. For... More »

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