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Storm Unloads on Northeast

Much of the region could have 10 to 24 inches of snow by Tuesday
By Newser Editors and Wire Services
Posted Dec 2, 2019 6:45 PM CST
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Edisa Weeks gives her 5-year-old nephew, Niko Brown, a push down a hill Monday in Brattleboro, Vermont.   (Kristopher Radder/The Brattleboro Reformer via AP)
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(Newser) – A seemingly endless winter storm that hindered travel across most of the country over th holiday weekend is delivering a last wallop as it swoops through the Northeast, dumping heavy snow, shuttering hundreds of schools and bedeviling commuters. The storm dropped more than a foot of snow in places late Sunday and Monday and could bring 10 to 24 inches total by Tuesday from Pennsylvania to Maine, forecasters said. Heavy snow was also expected in the Appalachian Mountains down to Tennessee and North Carolina, the AP reports. In Massachusetts, the storm was expected to be at its height during the Tuesday morning commute, with snow falling at 1 to 2 inches an hour in places. Boston Mayor Marty Walsh said city schools were canceling classes Tuesday. More than 700 flights were canceled and 5,200 delayed nationally, most of them in the Northeast, per ABC.

"It's moving very slowly, so the snow is just going to continue through the day," a National Weather Service meteorologist said Monday. By afternoon, the storm had dropped 27 inches in Delanson, New York, 25 miles northwest of Albany — the most in the Northeast so far. Forecasters predict accumulations near 30 inches by Tuesday morning in Vermont’s Green Mountains. The same storm has pummeled the US for days as it moved across the country. Gov. Andrew Cuomo declared a state of emergency for seven counties in eastern New York and assigned 300 National Guard members to assist with snow removal. State police had responded to more than 740 storm-related crashes since the snow started. In Nashua, New Hampshire, Alana Kirkpatrick didn’t enjoy her 5am "workout," which consisted of removing heaps of snow from her car. "Why do I still live in New England?" she said.

(Read more winter weather stories.)

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