The Latest: Senator: 'zero chance' Saudi prince not involved
By Associated Press
Dec 4, 2018 12:31 PM CST
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FILE - In this Sept. 24, 2018, file photo, CIA Director Gina Haspel addresses the audience in Louisville, Ky. Haspel is headed to Capitol Hill to brief Senate leaders Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018, on the slaying of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi as senators weigh their next steps in possibly punishing the...  (Associated Press)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Latest on the briefing by CIA Director Gina Haspel on the killing of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi (all times local):

1:25 p.m.

Senators leaving a briefing with CIA Director Gina Haspel say they are even more convinced that Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman was involved in the death of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi.

Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Bob Corker said he believes if the crown prince were put on trial, a jury would find him guilty in "about 30 minutes."

Tuesday's briefing comes as the Senate weighs punishing the longtime Middle East ally over the killing. President Donald Trump has equivocated over who is to blame. Frustrated with the administration's response, senators voted last week to move forward on a resolution curtailing U.S. backing for the Saudi-led war in Yemen.

South Carolina Sen. Lindsey Graham said there is "zero chance" the crown prince wasn't involved in Khashoggi's death.

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12 p.m.

CIA Director Gina Haspel has briefed Senate leaders on the slaying of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi as senators weigh punishing the longtime Middle East ally over the killing.

The CIA director met with a small group of senators, including the chairmen and ranking senators on the key national security committees.

Senators from both parties were angry last week that Haspel didn't attend a closed-door session with top administration officials about Khashoggi's killing and the U.S. response, which many senators have said is lacking.

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Defense Secretary Jim Mattis led the earlier briefing and tried to dissuade senators from punishing Saudi Arabia with a resolution to curtail U.S. backing for the Saudi-led war in Yemen. Human rights groups say the war is wreaking havoc on the country and subjecting civilians to indiscriminate bombing.