Okla.'s July Was Hottest US Month on Record

Texas also set its own record for hottest July

By Newser Editors and Wire Services

Posted Aug 8, 2011 5:29 PM CDT

(Newser) – Sweltering may have reached a new record last month, as Oklahoma racked up the country's highest monthly average temperature ever. That's the highest average temperature, for any month, for any state, associate Oklahoma state climatologist Gary McManus said. According to automated weather recording instruments, the state's average for July was 89.1 degrees. That tops an average of 88.1 set in July 1954, McManus said.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration today reported that last month was the fourth hottest July on record for the United States overall, and that Texas and Oklahoma had their warmest months on record. Nationwide, in the past 30 days 3,709 high temperature records have been set or tied. And, worse, there have been 7,410 records for overnight warmth broken or tied, meaning less chance to recover from the sweltering daytime readings. "This has been a devastating year," National Weather Service director Jack Hayes said.

A rural pond is evaporating away from its banks in Norman, Okla., Friday, July 29, 2011. A drought has left Oklahoma the driest it has been since the 1930s.
A rural pond is evaporating away from its banks in Norman, Okla., Friday, July 29, 2011. A drought has left Oklahoma the driest it has been since the 1930s.   (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Hay bales are pictured in a dry field in Norman, Okla., Friday, July 29, 2011. A drought has left Oklahoma the driest it has been since the 1930s.
Hay bales are pictured in a dry field in Norman, Okla., Friday, July 29, 2011. A drought has left Oklahoma the driest it has been since the 1930s.   (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
A lone cow grazes in a dry field in Norman, Okla., Friday, July 29, 2011. A drought has left Oklahoma the driest it has been since the 1930s.
A lone cow grazes in a dry field in Norman, Okla., Friday, July 29, 2011. A drought has left Oklahoma the driest it has been since the 1930s.   (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Danica Moore, 5, of Tulsa, Okla., cools off in a fountain at the Oklahoma City Zoo, Monday, July 18, 2011. Much of the nation is in the grip of a broiling heat wave.
Danica Moore, 5, of Tulsa, Okla., cools off in a fountain at the Oklahoma City Zoo, Monday, July 18, 2011. Much of the nation is in the grip of a broiling heat wave.   (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
In this July 22, 2011 photo, a corn field is ready for harvest near Hondo, Texas.  Drought has spread over much of the southern U.S., leaving Oklahoma the driest it has been since the 1930s.
In this July 22, 2011 photo, a corn field is ready for harvest near Hondo, Texas. Drought has spread over much of the southern U.S., leaving Oklahoma the driest it has been since the 1930s.   (AP Photo/Eric Gay)
Harold Ferslew and Aldo Rubio spread 550 degree hot tar on a roof on July 20, 2011 in Oklahoma City. Oklahoma has had 28 days over 100 degrees so far this summer.
Harold Ferslew and Aldo Rubio spread 550 degree hot tar on a roof on July 20, 2011 in Oklahoma City. Oklahoma has had 28 days over 100 degrees so far this summer.   (Getty Images)
Malee, a 3-month-old Asian elephant, cools off with a spray of water in her wading pool at the Oklahoma City Zoo, Monday, July 18, 2011.
Malee, a 3-month-old Asian elephant, cools off with a spray of water in her wading pool at the Oklahoma City Zoo, Monday, July 18, 2011.   (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
The average temperature in Oklahoma was 89.1 degrees -- a record for the hottest month ever seen in any state in the union.
The average temperature in Oklahoma was 89.1 degrees -- a record for the hottest month ever seen in any state in the union.   (Getty Images)
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We've been beating temperature records left and right, from the 1930s Dust Bowl drought and the 1950s drought. - Oklahoma climatologist Gary McManus

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