Romney Calls Occupy Wall Street 'Class Warfare'
And other tales from the front...
By Kate Seamons,  Newser Staff
Posted Oct 5, 2011 9:08 AM CDT
ORLANDO, FL - SEPTEMBER 23: Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) at the Orange County Convention Center, on September 23, 2011 in Orlando,...   (Getty Images)
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(Newser) – Occupy Wall Street protesters are unlikely to find a friend in Mitt Romney. While speaking to a retirement community in Florida last night, the presidential candidate responded to a question about the anti-Wall Street protests with a brief but decidedly unsupportive comment, as reported by the National Journal: "I think it’s dangerous, this class warfare." In other Occupy Wall Street news:

  • NPR reports that the "Occupy Colleges" movement plans to make a big stand today. A "nationwide college student walk out" is slated to occur at noon, and according to the group's website, some 75 colleges—from UT Austin to UCLA to the Fashion Institute of Technology—plan to participate.

  • From the streets to the courthouse: Bloomberg reports that five group members yesterday filed a civil rights complaint related to the arrest of 700 protesters on the Brooklyn Bridge on Saturday. They're suing NYC, Michael Bloomberg, and NYPD Commissioner Ray Kelly over alleged constitutional rights violations, and claim the NYPD "blocked the ability of persons to leave the bridge from the rear, and arrested hundreds of protesters in the absence of probable cause."
  • The money is pouring in, reports the New York Daily News. About $35,000 has been donated since the protests began 19 days ago. Another $30,000 was donated via Kickstarter, with the funds going to print 50,000 copied of the Occupied Wall Street Journal.
  • The Los Angeles Times reports on its own city's now five-day-old movement. Protesters yesterday burst into a bankers conference at a Newport Beach yacht club chanting "make banks pay!", and demonstrated outside a financial exec's Bel Air home. Among its upcoming plans: To cart trash from a foreclosure-battered neighborhood and deposit it at a bank protesters believe is at fault.