Firebombed Paper's Cover Now Boasts a Kissing Muslim
'Love is stronger than hate,' says 'Charlie Hebdo'
By Mary Papenfuss,  Newser User
Posted Nov 8, 2011 3:54 AM CST
Satirical French newspaper Charlie Hebdo's editor in chief talks in front of the headquarters of the newspaper after the firebombing.   (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)
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(Newser) – Remember the boundary-busting French satirical newspaper that was firebombed for making the Prophet Mohammed a "guest editor"? Journalists toned down the controversy this time around—not. In fact, right on the cover, a Muslim is planting a big, slobbery kiss on a figure representing the publication, Charlie Hebdo. Above the embrace are the words: "Love is stronger than hate." The Guardian says the paper "isn't holding back," while Gawker—convinced the Muslim is a "gay Mohammad" (though he's not in the garb of the prophet)—calls it the "ballsiest paper in the world."

Charlie Hebdo's editor said after the firebombing that "freedom to have a good laugh is as important as freedom of speech." The French, including some Muslim leaders, have strongly supported the publication, which is now operating out of the offices of the left-wing Paris newspaper Liberation. "I am extremely attached to the freedom of the press, even if the press is not always tender with Muslims, Islam, or the Paris Mosque," said the head of the Paris Mosque.
 

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