Super Committee May Punt on Toughest Tax Decisions
Temporary deal would defer details until after the 2012 elections
By Mark Russell,  Newser Staff
Posted Nov 12, 2011 8:43 AM CST
The US Capitol is seen in Washington on April 8, 2011 as a government shutdown loomed. With the debt super committee deadlocked, congressional leaders are again discussing delaying action.   (Getty Images)

(Newser) – With Congress's debt committee apparently deadlocked and its Nov. 23 deadline looming, both parties are talking about putting off the toughest decisions until after the 2012 elections, reports the LA Times. Worried that a final deal would only inflame both bases and that outright failure would result in brutal cuts that could hurt the economy, Democrats and Republicans are discussing a middle ground: Reach the broad outlines of a deal—including a promise to revamp the tax code—and fill in the details later.

"By kicking it into next year you're basically saying you're going to have this litigated in the next election," says a vice president of the US Chamber of Commerce. Both parties would have to agree to significant concessions to make even this temporary deal work, notes the Times, with Democrats agreeing to cuts in Medicaid and Medicare, and Republicans budging on their no-new-taxes stance.