Lie Detector Tests to Ferret Out Intel Media Leaks
New rules aim to stem the stories on secrets
By Mary Papenfuss,  Newser User
Posted Jun 26, 2012 2:49 AM CDT
Updated Jun 26, 2012 3:10 AM CDT
National Intelligence director James Clapper takes action.   (AP Photo/Ann Heisenfelt, File)

(Newser) – The National Intelligence director has announced new strategies to ferret out the people leaking secret information to the media. Intelligence officials will face new lie detector questions and tests, as well as possible scrutiny by a new inspector general, reports the New York Times, one of the primary beneficiaries of the recent leaks on such developments as cyber warfare, and drone strikes. The critical need to stop leaks has "profound implications for current and future intelligence capabilities and our nation’s security," director James Clapper said in a statement as he announced the changes. Routine lie detector tests will now specifically ask officials whether they leaked information, and staffers may be called in at any time for a new test by investigators probing the source of leaks, Clapper explained.

Under the new rules, the director can also ask for an independent probe by the inspector general to insure than investigations aren't closed prematurely. Also under consideration are rules that members of the intelligence committee be required to automatically disclose any substantial contact with a member of the media, reports MSNBC. The rules will apply to the 17 agencies and organizations within the intelligence community coalition, which includes the FBI, National Security Agency, and the Defense Intelligence Agency. Not affected by the new rules will be military service members with security clearances not assigned to an intelligence agency, White House officials or members of Congress. The rules may still fail to plug the leaks because most reporters get information from sources who don't work directly for the intelligence community, observers report.